C-61.1 - Act respecting the conservation and development of wildlife

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18. A wildlife protection officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a wildlife protection assistant until it is disposed of, confiscated, sold or returned. The wildlife protection officer is also responsible for the custody of the property seized and submitted in evidence, unless the judge to whom it was submitted in evidence decides otherwise.
A wildlife protection officer who seizes a vehicle, aircraft, boat or live animal, domestic animal, fish or invertebrate may entrust custody of it to a third party, on the conditions the officer and the third party agree on, or to the seized party, on the conditions the officer determines. The seized party must accept custody of the seized property.
The wildlife protection officer may return the property to the seized party or the owner rather than entrusting him with custody of it.
The person entrusted with custody of the seized property may not deteriorate or alienate it, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
The third party may not be prosecuted for an act performed or omitted in good faith during custody.
1983, c. 39, s. 18; 1986, c. 109, s. 6; 1992, c. 61, s. 226; 1996, c. 18, s. 3; 1996, c. 62, s. 48; 2000, c. 48, s. 4, s. 36; 2009, c. 49, s. 43; 2021, c. 242021, c. 24, s. 11.
18. A wildlife protection officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a wildlife protection assistant until a judge declares it confiscated or orders it returned to its owner. In addition, the wildlife protection officer is entrusted with the custody of the things seized and submitted in evidence, unless the judge to whom they were submitted in evidence decides otherwise.
However, in the case of a resident, the wildlife protection officer who seizes a vehicle, aircraft, boat or a live animal, fish or a dog may, after making, if necessary, the appropriate appraisal, place it in the custody of the offender.
The offender must accept custody of the seized property until a judge has declared it confiscated or has ordered it returned to its owner. In no case may the offender remove, deteriorate or alienate the property, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
Where possession of an animal, fish or pelt or of a specimen of a plant species referred to in section 13.1 is prohibited under the provisions of the Acts or regulations under which the seizure was made, the person from whom the animal, fish, pelt or specimen was seized may abandon it to the State.
1983, c. 39, s. 18; 1986, c. 109, s. 6; 1992, c. 61, s. 226; 1996, c. 18, s. 3; 1996, c. 62, s. 48; 2000, c. 48, s. 4, s. 36; 2009, c. 49, s. 43.
18. A protection officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a protection assistant until a judge declares it confiscated or orders it returned to its owner. In addition, the protection officer is entrusted with the custody of the things seized and submitted in evidence, unless the judge to whom they were submitted in evidence decides otherwise.
However, in the case of a resident, the protection officer who seizes a vehicle, aircraft, boat or a live animal, fish or a dog may, after making, if necessary, the appropriate appraisal, place it in the custody of the offender.
The offender must accept custody of the seized property until a judge has declared it confiscated or has ordered it returned to its owner. In no case may the offender remove, deteriorate or alienate the property, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
Where possession of an animal, fish or pelt or of a specimen of a plant species referred to in section 13.1 is prohibited under the provisions of the Acts or regulations under which the seizure was made, the person from whom the animal, fish, pelt or specimen was seized may abandon it to the State.
1983, c. 39, s. 18; 1986, c. 109, s. 6; 1992, c. 61, s. 226; 1996, c. 18, s. 3; 1996, c. 62, s. 48; 2000, c. 48, s. 4, s. 36.
18. A conservation officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a conservation assistant until a judge declares it confiscated or orders it returned to its owner. In addition, the conservation officer is entrusted with the custody of the things seized and submitted in evidence, unless the judge to whom they were submitted in evidence decides otherwise.
However, in the case of a resident, the conservation officer who seizes a vehicle, aircraft, boat or a live animal, fish or a dog may, after making, if necessary, the appropriate appraisal, place it in the custody of the offender.
The offender must accept custody of the seized property until a judge has declared it confiscated or has ordered it returned to its owner. In no case may the offender remove, deteriorate or alienate the property, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
1983, c. 39, s. 18; 1986, c. 109, s. 6; 1992, c. 61, s. 226; 1996, c. 18, s. 3; 1996, c. 62, s. 48.
18. A conservation officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a deputy conservation officer until a judge declares it confiscated or orders it returned to its owner. In addition, the conservation officer is entrusted with the custody of the things seized and submitted in evidence, unless the judge to whom they were submitted in evidence decides otherwise.
However, in the case of a resident, the conservation officer who seizes a vehicle, aircraft, boat or a live animal, fish or a dog may, after making, if necessary, the appropriate appraisal, place it in the custody of the offender.
The offender must accept custody of the seized property until a judge has declared it confiscated or has ordered it returned to its owner. In no case may the offender remove, deteriorate or alienate the property, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
1983, c. 39, s. 18; 1986, c. 109, s. 6; 1992, c. 61, s. 226; 1996, c. 18, s. 3.
18. A conservation officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a deputy conservation officer until a judge declares it confiscated or orders it returned to its owner. In addition, the conservation officer is entrusted with the custody of the things seized and submitted in evidence, unless the judge to whom they were submitted in evidence decides otherwise.
However, in the case of a resident, the conservation officer who seizes a vehicle, aircraft, boat or dog may, after making, if necessary, the appropriate appraisal, place it in the custody of the offender.
The offender must accept custody of the seized property until a judge has declared it confiscated or has ordered it returned to its owner. In no case may the offender remove, deteriorate or alienate the property, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
1983, c. 39, s. 18; 1986, c. 109, s. 6; 1992, c. 61, s. 226.
18. A conservation officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a deputy conservation officer until a judge declares it confiscated or orders it returned to its owner.
However, in the case of a resident, the conservation officer who seizes a vehicle, aircraft, boat or dog may, after making, if necessary, the appropriate appraisal, place it in the custody of the offender.
The offender must accept custody of the seized property until a judge has declared it confiscated or has ordered it returned to its owner. In no case may the offender remove, deteriorate or alienate the property, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
1983, c. 39, s. 18; 1986, c. 109, s. 6.
18. A conservation officer is responsible for the custody of property he has seized or which has been delivered to him by a deputy conservation officer until a judge declares it confiscated or orders it returned to its owner.
However, in the case of a resident, the conservation officer who seizes a vehicle or an aircraft shall, as soon as possible, after making the appropriate expertise, as the case may be, place it in the custody of the offender and, in the case of a dog or a boat, he may place it in the custody of the offender.
The offender must accept custody of the seized property until a judge has declared it confiscated or has ordered it returned to its owner. In no case may the offender remove, deteriorate or alienate the property, on pain of a fine equivalent to the value of the seized property.
1983, c. 39, s. 18.