CCQ-1991 - Civil Code of Québec

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23. When the court is called upon to rule on an application for authorization with respect to care or the alienation of a part of a person’s body, it obtains the opinions of experts, of the person having parental authority, of the mandatary, of the tutor or the curator and of the tutorship council; it may also obtain the opinion of any person who shows a special interest in the person concerned by the application.
The court is also bound to obtain the opinion of the person concerned unless that is impossible, and to respect his refusal unless the care is required by his state of health.
1991, c. 64, a. 23; 1998, c. 32, s. 2; I.N. 2014-05-01.
23. When the court is called upon to rule on an application for authorization with respect to care or the alienation of a body part, it obtains the opinions of experts, of the person having parental authority, of the mandatary, of the tutor or the curator and of the tutorship council; it may also obtain the opinion of any person who shows a special interest in the person concerned by the application.
The court is also bound to obtain the opinion of the person concerned unless that is impossible, and to respect his refusal unless the care is required by his state of health.
1991, c. 64, a. 23; 1998, c. 32, s. 2.
23. When the court is called upon to rule on an application for authorization with respect to care, the alienation of a part of the body, or an experiment, it obtains the opinions of experts, of the person having parental authority, of the mandatary, of the tutor or the curator and of the tutorship council; it may also obtain the opinion of any person who shows a special interest in the person concerned by the application.
The court is also bound to obtain the opinion of the person concerned unless that is impossible, and to respect his refusal unless the care is required by his state of health.
1991, c. 64, a. 23.