C-26 - Professional Code

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87. The board of directors must make, by regulation, a code of ethics governing the general and special duties of the professional towards the public, his clients and his profession, particularly the duty to discharge his professional obligations with integrity. Such code must contain, inter alia:
(1)  provisions to prevent conflict of interest situations;
(1.1)  provisions expressly stating that any act involving collusion, corruption, malfeasance, breach of trust or influence peddling is forbidden;
(1.2)  provisions requiring a member of an order to inform the syndic if the member has reason to believe that a situation likely to affect the competence or integrity of another member of the order has arisen;
(2)  provisions defining, if applicable, the professions, trades, industries, businesses, offices or duties incompatible with the dignity or practice of the profession;
(3)  provisions to preserve the secrecy of confidential information that becomes known to the members of the order in the practice of their profession, and provisions setting out the conditions on which a professional may, in accordance with the third paragraph of section 60.4, communicate the information described in that paragraph and the procedure applicable;
(4)  provisions setting out the conditions and procedure applicable to the exercise of the rights of access and correction provided for in sections 60.5 and 60.6, and provisions concerning a professional’s obligation to release documents to his client;
(5)  provisions setting out conditions, obligations and, where applicable, prohibitions in respect of advertising by the members of the order;
(6)  provisions identifying offences, if any, for the purposes of subparagraphs 5 and 6 of the first paragraph of section 45 or of the first paragraph of section 55.1.
1973, c. 43, s. 85; 1975, c. 80, s. 8; 1990, c. 76, s. 3; 1994, c. 40, s. 75; 2001, c. 78, s. 6; 2008, c. 11, s. 1, s. 56; 2017, c. 112017, c. 11, s. 51.
87. The board of directors must make, by regulation, a code of ethics governing the general and special duties of the professional towards the public, his clients and his profession, particularly the duty to discharge his professional obligations with integrity. Such code must contain, inter alia:
(1)  provisions to prevent conflict of interest situations;
(2)  provisions defining, if applicable, the professions, trades, industries, businesses, offices or duties incompatible with the dignity or practice of the profession;
(3)  provisions to preserve the secrecy of confidential information that becomes known to the members of the order in the practice of their profession, and provisions setting out the conditions on which a professional may, in accordance with the third paragraph of section 60.4, communicate the information described in that paragraph and the procedure applicable;
(4)  provisions setting out the conditions and procedure applicable to the exercise of the rights of access and correction provided for in sections 60.5 and 60.6, and provisions concerning a professional’s obligation to release documents to his client;
(5)  provisions setting out conditions, obligations and, where applicable, prohibitions in respect of advertising by the members of the order;
(6)  provisions identifying offences, if any, for the purposes of subparagraphs 5 and 6 of the first paragraph of section 45 or of the first paragraph of section 55.1.
1973, c. 43, s. 85; 1975, c. 80, s. 8; 1990, c. 76, s. 3; 1994, c. 40, s. 75; 2001, c. 78, s. 6; 2008, c. 11, s. 1, s. 56.
87. The Bureau must make, by regulation, a code of ethics governing the general and special duties of the professional towards the public, his clients and his profession, particularly the duty to discharge his professional obligations with integrity. Such code must contain, inter alia:
(1)  provisions determining which acts are derogatory to the dignity of the profession;
(2)  provisions defining, if applicable, the professions, trades, industries, businesses, offices or duties incompatible with the dignity or practice of the profession;
(3)  provisions to preserve the secrecy of confidential information that becomes known to the members of the order in the practice of their profession;
(4)  provisions setting out the conditions and procedure applicable to the exercise of the rights of access and correction provided for in sections 60.5 and 60.6, and provisions concerning a professional’s obligation to release documents to his client;
(5)  provisions setting out conditions, obligations and, where applicable, prohibitions in respect of advertising by the members of the order.
Such code must include provisions stating the terms and conditions according to which a professional may communicate the information pursuant to the third paragraph of section 60.4.
1973, c. 43, s. 85; 1975, c. 80, s. 8; 1990, c. 76, s. 3; 1994, c. 40, s. 75; 2001, c. 78, s. 6.
87. The Bureau must make, by regulation, a code of ethics governing the general and special duties of the professional towards the public, his clients and his profession, particularly the duty to discharge his professional obligations with integrity. Such code must contain, inter alia:
(1)  provisions determining which acts are derogatory to the dignity of the profession;
(2)  provisions defining, if applicable, the professions, trades, industries, businesses, offices or duties incompatible with the dignity or practice of the profession;
(3)  provisions to preserve the secrecy of confidential information that becomes known to the members of the order in the practice of their profession;
(4)  provisions setting out the conditions and procedure applicable to the exercise of the rights of access and correction provided for in sections 60.5 and 60.6, and provisions concerning a professional’s obligation to release documents to his client;
(5)  provisions setting out conditions, obligations and, where applicable, prohibitions in respect of advertising by the members of the order.
1973, c. 43, s. 85; 1975, c. 80, s. 8; 1990, c. 76, s. 3; 1994, c. 40, s. 75.
87. The Bureau must make, by regulation, a code of ethics governing the general and special duties of the professional towards the public, his clients and his profession, particularly the duty to discharge his professional obligations with integrity. Such code must contain, inter alia:
(1)  provisions determining which acts are derogatory to the dignity of the profession;
(2)  provisions defining, if applicable, the professions, trades, industries, businesses, offices or duties incompatible with the dignity or practice of the profession;
(3)  provisions to preserve the secrecy of confidential information that becomes known to the members of the corporation in the practice of their profession;
(4)  provisions respecting the right of any person having recourse to the services of a professional to take cognizance of the documents regarding him in any record made by that professional about him and to obtain copies of those documents;
(5)  provisions setting out conditions, obligations and, where applicable, prohibitions in respect of advertising by its members.
1973, c. 43, s. 85; 1975, c. 80, s. 8; 1990, c. 76, s. 3.
87. The Bureau must make, by regulation, a code of ethics governing the general and special duties of the professional towards the public, his clients and his profession, particularly the duty to discharge his professional obligations with integrity. Such code must contain, inter alia:
(1)  provisions determining which acts are derogatory to the dignity of the profession;
(2)  provisions defining, if applicable, the professions, trades, industries, businesses, offices or duties incompatible with the dignity or practice of the profession;
(3)  provisions to preserve the secrecy of confidential information that becomes known to the members of the corporation in the practice of their profession;
(4)  provisions respecting the right of any person having recourse to the services of a professional to take cognizance of the documents regarding him in any record made by that professional about him and to obtain copies of those documents.
1973, c. 43, s. 85; 1975, c. 80, s. 8.