C-47.1 - Municipal Powers Act

Full text
chapter C-47.1
Municipal Powers Act
MUNICIPAL POWERSMay 24 2005January 1 2006
TITLE I
SCOPE AND INTERPRETATION
1. This Act applies to local municipalities and regional county municipalities but not to Northern, Cree or Naskapi villages.
2005, c. 6, s. 1.
2. Under this Act, municipalities are granted powers enabling them to respond to various changing municipal needs in the interest of their citizens. The provisions of the Act are not to be interpreted in a literal or restrictive manner.
2005, c. 6, s. 2.
3. A provision of a municipal by-law adopted under this Act that is inconsistent with a provision of an Act or regulation of the Government or one of its ministers is inoperative.
2005, c. 6, s. 3.
TITLE II
POWERS OF A LOCAL MUNICIPALITY
CHAPTER I
GENERAL PROVISIONS
4. In addition to the areas of jurisdiction conferred on it by other Acts, a local municipality has jurisdiction in the following fields:
(1)  culture, recreation, community activities and parks;
(2)  local economic development, to the extent set out in Chapter III;
(3)  power development and community telecommunications systems;
(4)  the environment;
(5)  sanitation;
(6)  nuisances;
(7)  safety; and
(8)  transportation.
A local municipality may adopt non-regulatory measures in the fields listed in the first paragraph and as regards childcare. However, a local municipality may not delegate a power in those fields except to the extent provided by law.
2005, c. 6, s. 4; 2005, c. 28, s. 177.
5. Under this Act and to the extent provided for in it, a local municipality adopts a by-law when it wishes to make a rule of a general and impersonal nature mandatory.
2005, c. 6, s. 5.
6. In exercising a regulatory power under this Act, a local municipality may, in particular,
(1)  prescribe prohibitions;
(2)  specify the cases where a permit is required, limit the number of permits and prescribe the cost, conditions and terms of issue and the rules governing the suspension or revocation of a permit;
(3)  provide that one or more provisions of a by-law apply to part or all of its territory;
(4)  create classes and make specific rules for each of them;
(5)  prescribe the obligation to furnish security to ensure that premises are restored to their original state when a person carries on an activity or carries out work in the public domain; and
(6)  prescribe rules that refer to standards made or approved by a third person. These rules may provide that changes made to the standards form part of the standards as if they had been adopted by the local municipality. Such changes come into force on the date set by the municipality under a resolution the adoption of which must be the subject of a public notice in accordance with the Act governing that municipality.
When a local municipality requires an itinerant merchant to obtain a permit under subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph, that permit may only be issued to a person who provides proof of having first obtained a permit in accordance with the Consumer Protection Act (chapter P-40.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 6.
CHAPTER II
CULTURE, RECREATION, COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES AND PARKS
7. A local municipality may make by-laws governing the cultural, recreational and community services it offers and the use of its parks.
2005, c. 6, s. 7.
7.1. A local municipality may entrust a person with the operation of its parks or its facilities or public places intended for cultural, recreational or community activities.
A contract under the first paragraph may also stipulate that the person must finance any work carried out under the contract. In that case, the Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply.
2005, c. 50, s. 104.
8. In cooperation with a non-profit body, a school board or an educational institution, a local municipality may establish or operate a cultural, recreational or community facility in its territory or, after notifying the municipality concerned, outside its territory.
It may also grant assistance to a person outside its territory for the establishment and operation of facilities and public places intended for cultural, recreational or community activities.
2005, c. 6, s. 8.
CHAPTER III
LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
9. In order to promote its economic development, a local municipality may establish and operate
(1)  a convention centre or an exhibition centre;
(2)  a public market;
(3)  a railway siding; and
(4)  a tourist information office.
It may entrust a person with the operation of a facility referred to in the first paragraph.
A contract under the second paragraph may also stipulate that the person must finance any work carried out under the contract. In that case, the Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply.
2005, c. 6, s. 9; 2005, c. 50, s. 105.
10. A local municipality may, by by-law, regulate
(1)  the use of the services offered in the facilities listed in the first paragraph of section 9;
(2)  economic activities; and
(3)  the exhibiting, carrying or distribution of printed matter or other objects on a public road or a private immovable.
2005, c. 6, s. 10.
11. A local municipality may establish a non-profit body whose purpose is to provide technical support to an enterprise situated in its territory.
2005, c. 6, s. 11.
12. A local municipality whose territory is included in that of a regional county municipality must make an annual contribution in support of the local development centre by paying a sum the amount of which is determined by by-law of the regional county municipality or according to rules prescribed in the by-law.
In the absence of a by-law referred to in the first paragraph when the budget of the regional county municipality is adopted for a fiscal year, the amount to be paid by each local municipality for the fiscal year is determined in accordance with the regulation under the third paragraph.
The Government may, by regulation, prescribe the rules for determining the amount that each local municipality is required to pay in the circumstance described in the second paragraph. The regulation may prescribe separate rules that vary from one regional county municipality to another.
The sum is integrated into the share that the local municipality is required to pay to the regional county municipality under section 205.1 of the Act respecting land use planning and development (chapter A-19.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 12.
13. Section 12 applies, with the necessary modifications, to a local municipality whose territory is not included in that of a regional county municipality.
In the case of Ville de Montréal, if two or more local development centres carry on their activities in the territory of the municipality, the by-law provided for in the first paragraph of section 12 must prescribe rules for the apportionment of the sum among those centres.
The second and third paragraphs of section 12 do not apply to Ville de Laval.
2005, c. 6, s. 13.
13.1. A local municipality may acquire a financial interest in a development fund created in its territory within the framework of the FIER-Regions or the Support Funds component of the government program known as the Regional Economic Intervention Fund (FIER).
The interest mentioned in the first paragraph may, in particular, be in the form of a loan or an investment made by subscribing to shares of the capital stock or the common stock of a limited partnership formed to administer the fund.
2005, c. 50, s. 106.
CHAPTER IV
POWER AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS
14. A local municipality may, by by-law, regulate the use of the power it develops.
2005, c. 6, s. 14.
15. A local municipality may entrust a person with selling the power produced by a residual materials disposal facility or water purification works.
2005, c. 6, s. 15.
16. A local municipality may make by-laws on the placing of wires, including wire burial.
It may also prescribe, by by-law, that poles and other supportive facilities must be used in common by any persons operating a telecommunications or electric company or any other service of the same nature.
2005, c. 6, s. 16.
17. A local municipality may form a limited partnership with Hydro-Québec for the purpose, among other things, of producing electricity.
Hydro-Québec must at all times provide at least half of the contribution to the common stock of the limited partnership, and must be the partnership’s general partner.
2005, c. 6, s. 17.
17.1. A local municipality may form a limited partnership with a private-sector enterprise for the purpose of producing electric power by harnessing wind energy.
The private-sector enterprise must at all times provide at least half of the contribution to the common stock of the partnership and must be the partnership’s general partner.
2005, c. 50, s. 107.
17.2. With the authorization of the Minister, a local municipality that formed a limited partnership under section 17.1 may stand surety for it.
Before giving the authorization, the Minister may order the municipality to submit the decision authorizing suretyship to the approval of the qualified voters, according to the procedure prescribed for the approval of loan by-laws.
2005, c. 50, s. 107.
17.3. The total amount of the contribution and the surety bond provided by the municipality under sections 17.1 and 17.2 may not exceed the amount required to set up a wind farm with a generating capacity of 25 megawatts.
Furthermore, the total amount of the contributions and the surety bonds provided by all the local municipalities and regional county municipalities for a partnership referred to in section 17.1 may not exceed half of the contribution made to the common stock of the partnership.
2005, c. 50, s. 107.
18. A local municipality may make by-laws on the use of any community telecommunications system it possesses.
The municipality may not acquire existing community telecommunications systems by expropriation.
2005, c. 6, s. 18.
CHAPTER V
ENVIRONMENT
DIVISION I
GENERAL PROVISIONS
19. A local municipality may adopt by-laws on environmental matters.
2005, c. 6, s. 19.
20. A local municipality may mandate a social trust that it has constituted for environmental purposes to carry out work on an immovable resulting from a program referred to in the second paragraph of section 92.
2005, c. 6, s. 20.
DIVISION II
WATER SUPPLY, SEWERS AND WATER PURIFICATION
§ 1.  — General provisions
21. The municipality is not liable for damage caused to an immovable or its contents if the owner of the immovable neglects or omits to install an apparatus intended to reduce the risk of malfunction of a water supply system or sewer system in accordance with the by-law adopted under section 19. Such a by-law may apply to an immovable already erected if it prescribes a minimum period of one year to allow the owner to comply with that obligation.
2005, c. 6, s. 21.
22. A local municipality may entrust a person with the operation of its waterworks or sewer system or other water supply or water purification works for a maximum term of 25 years.
A contract under the first paragraph may also stipulate that the person must finance any work carried out under the contract. In that case, the Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply.
The resolution authorizing a contract made under the first paragraph must be submitted for approval to the qualified voters and the Government.
2005, c. 6, s. 22; 2005, c. 50, s. 108.
23. Despite its by-laws governing the water supply, a local municipality may enter into agreements with a person whose activities require an unusually high water consumption.
2005, c. 6, s. 23.
24. In exercising its powers as regards water supply, sewers and water purification, a local municipality may carry out work on a private road and is not bound to pay any compensation for the use of that road to carry out the work.
2005, c. 6, s. 24.
25. A local municipality may install private conduits, water intakes and sewer outlets and connect private conduits to public conduits at the expense of the owner.
2005, c. 6, s. 25.
26. In order to serve its territory, a local municipality may also exercise, outside its territory, its powers as regards water supply and sewers.
The by-laws adopted under section 19 apply to the owner or occupant of an immovable outside its territory served by the municipality under an intermunicipal agreement.
2005, c. 6, s. 26.
§ 2.  — Water supply
27. The municipality may suspend the supply of water only
(1)  if a person makes abusive use of the water or controls equipment that causes water to be wasted or the quality of the water to deteriorate, and fails to take the required corrective measures within 10 days after the municipality sends a notice exposing the problem, indicating the corrective measures to be taken and informing the person that the water supply could be suspended. The suspension continues until corrective measures are taken;
(2)  if a person refuses to admit the municipal employees responsible for ensuring the proper functioning of the water supply system or the application of a by-law adopted under a provision of this chapter. The supply of water is suspended so long as the refusal continues;
(3)  if a person operating an enterprise fails to pay for the water supply and has not remedied the situation within 30 days of a notice to that effect sent by the municipality.
The sum required for the water supply, except to the extent that it is related to actual consumption, remains payable throughout the period in which the service is suspended under the first paragraph.
2005, c. 6, s. 27.
28. A local municipality is not bound to guarantee the quantity of water to be supplied.
No person may refuse to pay the water rate on account of a lack of water.
2005, c. 6, s. 28.
§ 3.  — 
Repealed, 2005, c. 50, s. 109.
2005, c. 50, s. 109.
29. (Repealed).
2005, c. 6, s. 29; 2005, c. 50, s. 109.
30. (Repealed).
2005, c. 6, s. 30; 2005, c. 50, s. 109.
31. (Repealed).
2005, c. 6, s. 31; 2005, c. 50, s. 109.
32. (Repealed).
2005, c. 6, s. 32; 2005, c. 50, s. 109.
33. (Repealed).
2005, c. 6, s. 33; 2005, c. 50, s. 109.
DIVISION III
RESIDUAL MATERIALS
2005, c. 50, s. 110.
34. A local municipality may entrust a person with the operation of its residual materials disposal and reclamation system.
A contract under the first paragraph may also stipulate that the person must finance any work carried out under the contract. In such a case, the Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply.
2005, c. 6, s. 34; 2005, c. 50, s. 110.
DIVISION IV
COMMON FENCE, COMMON DITCH, DRAINAGE DITCH AND CLEARANCE
35. A local municipality may designate a person to try to resolve the disagreements referred to in section 36.
Subject to the conditions set out in the instrument of designation, the local municipality may broaden the designated person’s mandate to cover all the owners in its territory.
The remuneration and eligible expenses of the designated person are specified in the instrument of designation.
2005, c. 6, s. 35.
36. The owner of land situated in the agricultural zone of a local municipality within the meaning of subparagraph 17 of the first paragraph of section 1 of the Act respecting the preservation of agricultural land and agricultural activities (chapter P-41.1), the owner of land situated outside that zone and who carries on an agricultural activity within the meaning of subparagraph 0.1 of the first paragraph of section 1 of that Act on that land, or the owner of land who carries on forest activities on that land may, regarding that land, request the designated person in writing to examine a matter and try to resolve a disagreement relating to
(1)  the construction, repair or maintenance of a common fence or common ditch under article 1002 of the Civil Code;
(2)  drainage work on that land involving the creation, improvement or maintenance of a drainage ditch
(a)  used solely for drainage or irrigation;
(b)  that was artificially created; or
(c)  the watershed of which has an area of less than 100 hectares; or
(3)  clearances under article 986 of the Civil Code.
The application must describe the nature, extent and expected cost of the proposed work and provide an estimate of the contribution the interested owners must make.
The owner of land adjacent to land referred to in the first paragraph may exercise the rights set out in that paragraph regarding that land, even if the owner does not meet the criteria specified in the paragraph.
The designated person does not lose his or her mandate simply because
(1)  there is a maximum discrepancy of 10% in the evaluation of the drained area; or
(2)  the application also concerns land situated in the territory of another local municipality.
2005, c. 6, s. 36.
37. After serving a three-day notice on the interested owners, to which is attached a copy of the application, the designated person goes to the premises to examine the situation and endeavour to bring the owners to an agreement.
2005, c. 6, s. 37.
38. The designated person may visit land that is the subject of an application at any reasonable time and require the production of any document or information considered necessary.
2005, c. 6, s. 38.
39. If the designated person is of the opinion that land belonging to an interested owner who was not notified under section 37 will be affected by the work, the designated person may inform that owner so that the owner may submit observations.
2005, c. 6, s. 39.
40. After giving all the interested owners an opportunity to submit observations, the designated person may communicate his or her conclusions to them, endeavour to bring them to an agreement, and, if applicable, order the carrying out of work, specifying the place, nature and extent of the work, the time limit for carrying it out, the contribution to be made by the interested parties, and the nature of their contribution.
The designated person may also order that all or part of the work be carried out by the local municipality, at the expense of the interested parties.
If there is a disagreement relating to drainage work, the contribution of an interested owner is determined according to the area of the owner’s land that drains into the drainage ditch, or, if it is impossible to determine it according to that criterion, according to the number of interested owners.
2005, c. 6, s. 40.
41. The designated person’s remuneration and expenses are borne by the interested owners proportionally to their share of the work.
In the case of an application that is not followed by an agreement or an order for the carrying out of work, the owner who made the application must pay the remuneration and expenses of the designated person.
2005, c. 6, s. 41.
42. If an interested owner fails to carry out his or her share of the work within the time stipulated in the order, the local municipality is authorized to do it at the expense of that owner.
2005, c. 6, s. 42.
43. A decision of the designated person must be communicated in writing and include reasons. It is notified to the interested owners and is executory on the expiry of 20 days after the date it is received.
2005, c. 6, s. 43.
44. The original of the decision is filed in the archives of the local municipality where the application to do the work was made and a copy of the decision is sent to any other local municipality concerned.
2005, c. 6, s. 44.
45. If land situated in the territory of more than one local municipality benefits from the work, any work not done by an interested owner is carried out under the authority of the council of the local municipality in whose territory the application to do the work was made under section 36.
2005, c. 6, s. 45.
46. The work is carried out according to the decision of the designated person and is inspected by the latter while being carried out and after being completed to ensure that the decision is complied with.
2005, c. 6, s. 46.
47. Once the work is completed, the designated person sends the inspection report to the local municipality where the application to do the work was made.
2005, c. 6, s. 47.
48. The local municipality where the application to do the work was made collects the contribution payable by an owner according to the decision of the person designated or because of the owner’s failure under section 42.
An amount owed by the owner of property situated in the territory of a neighbouring local municipality is paid by the latter on receipt, after the work is completed, of a copy of the inspection report by the designated person and a claim accompanied by vouchers sent to the neighbouring local municipality by the local municipality where the application to do the work was made. Section 96 applies to the recovery of the amount disbursed by the neighbouring local municipality.
2005, c. 6, s. 48.
49. No person may hinder a designated person in the exercise of the functions of office.
On request, the designated person must provide identification and produce proof of appointment signed by the clerk or the secretary-treasurer.
2005, c. 6, s. 49.
50. A person designated under section 35 may not be prosecuted for acts performed in good faith in the exercise of the functions of office.
2005, c. 6, s. 50.
51. An interested owner may apply to the Court of Québec for a review of the decision made by the designated person.
The motion must be made and served on the other interested owners within 20 days of receipt of the decision of the designated person. However, on reasonable grounds, the Court may relieve the applicant from failure to act within that time limit.
The filing of the motion with the office of the Court suspends the execution of the designated person’s decision until the judge has rendered a decision.
The Court may render any decision the person designated under section 40 could have rendered, and make any order designed to protect the rights of the parties. It may decide on every matter of fact or of law.
The decision is communicated in writing and includes reasons. It may not be appealed.
2005, c. 6, s. 51.
DIVISION V
OTHER PROVISIONS
52. A local municipality may, by by-law, prohibit the spreading of manure, sludge or residues from pulp and paper mills for up to 12 days, the dates of which are determined by the municipality so that the prohibition applies after 31 May and before 1 October and for not more than three consecutive days.
In order for the prohibition to apply in the course of a year, the by-law establishing it must be adopted by the last day of February and published by the last day of March of that year.
The clerk or the secretary-treasurer may, in writing and on request, authorize a person to carry out spreading prohibited by the by-law. Where it has rained for three consecutive days, the clerk or the secretary-treasurer must grant the authorization.
The by-law may prescribe maximum numbers of days that are greater than the numbers set out in the first paragraph if an agreement to that effect is entered into beforehand between the municipality and the regional federation that is affiliated with the association certified in accordance with section 8 of the Farm Producers Act (chapter P-28) and whose territory includes the greatest part of the municipality’s territory.
If most of the farm producers in the territory of the municipality are members of a syndicate, as defined in paragraph e of section 1 of the Farm Producers Act, affiliated with the regional federation referred to in the fourth paragraph, the agreement may be made with that syndicate.
2005, c. 6, s. 52.
53. A local municipality may apply pesticides on an immovable, with the consent of the owner.
2005, c. 6, s. 53.
54. A local municipality may plant and maintain plants on an immovable, with the consent of the owner.
2005, c. 6, s. 54.
CHAPTER VI
SANITATION
55. A local municipality may adopt by-laws in matters of sanitation.
Despite any provision of a special Act, a by-law under the first paragraph may not pertain to matters covered by the Food Products Act (chapter P-29).
2005, c. 6, s. 55.
56. If the owner or occupant of an immovable is convicted of an offence against a sanitation by-law, a judge, in addition to imposing any other penalty, may order the offender to abate the unsanitary condition within the time the judge prescribes or to have the necessary work carried out to prevent its recurrence. If the person fails to comply within the prescribed time, the unsanitary condition may be abated by the municipality at the expense of that person.
Prior notice of the application for an order must be given by the prosecutor to the person, who could be compelled, under such an order, to abate the unsanitary condition, except if the parties are in the presence of the judge.
2005, c. 6, s. 56.
57. If the municipality notes unsanitary conditions in connection with an immovable, it may send a formal notice to the owner or occupant of the immovable requiring the owner or occupant, within the time the municipality prescribes, to abate them or do the necessary work to prevent their recurrence.
2005, c. 6, s. 57.
58. If the formal notice sent under section 57 is not acted upon within the time mentioned, a judge of the Superior Court sitting in the district where the immovable is situated may, upon a motion presented even during the suit, require the owner or occupant of the immovable to take the steps required to abate the unsanitary condition within the time the judge determines or to prevent its recurrence, and order that, on failure to do so, the municipality may itself take the required steps at the expense of the owner or occupant.
When the owner and occupant of the immovable are unknown, unconfirmed or cannot be found, the judge may authorize the municipality to take immediate steps to remedy the situation and eventually claim the cost from the owner or occupant.
2005, c. 6, s. 58.
CHAPTER VII
NUISANCES
59. A local municipality may adopt by-laws on nuisances.
2005, c. 6, s. 59.
60. Section 56 applies, with the necessary modifications, to an offence against a by-law adopted under section 59.
2005, c. 6, s. 60.
61. If the municipality notes a nuisance in or on an immovable, sections 57 and 58 apply, with the necessary modifications.
2005, c. 6, s. 61.
CHAPTER VIII
SAFETY
62. A local municipality may adopt by-laws in matters of safety.
The municipality may remove an obstacle in the public domain at the expense of a person who fails to comply with a municipal by-law to that effect.
2005, c. 6, s. 62.
63. A local municipality may impound, sell for profit or eliminate a stray or dangerous animal. It may also have an animal suffering from a contagious disease isolated until cured, or eliminated, on a certificate from a veterinary surgeon.
The municipality may also enter into an agreement to authorize a person to enforce a by-law concerning animals. The person with whom the municipality enters into an agreement and the person’s employees have the powers of employees of the municipality for the purposes of the enforcement of the municipal by-law.
This section applies despite any inconsistent provision of the Agricultural Abuses Act (chapter A-2).
2005, c. 6, s. 63.
64. A local municipality may entrust a person with the organization and management of its fire prevention department.
2005, c. 6, s. 64.
65. A local municipality may authorize a peace officer to interrupt the sound signal of an alarm system and, for that purpose, to enter an immovable not belonging to the municipality if no one is in it at that time.
The local municipality may claim an amount it determines, by a by-law adopted under section 62, where such a system is defective or malfunctions or is set off for no valid reason.
2005, c. 6, s. 65.
CHAPTER IX
TRANSPORTATION
DIVISION I
ROADS
66. A local municipality has jurisdiction over public roads that are not under the authority of the Government of Québec or the Government of Canada or one of their departments or bodies.
In this Act, a public road includes any highway, road, street, lane, square, bridge, footpath or bicycle path, sidewalk or other road that is not in the private domain, and all the works or installations, including a ditch, needed for its improvement, operation or management.
2005, c. 6, s. 66.
67. A local municipality may adopt by-laws to regulate
(1)  any use of a public road not covered by the regulatory powers conferred on it by the Highway Safety Code (chapter C-24.2);
(2)  any encroachment on a public road;
(3)  excavations in the public roads of the municipality;
(4)  the construction and maintenance of works over or under a public road; and
(5)  the numbering of immovables.
2005, c. 6, s. 67.
68. A local municipality may regulate access to a public road.
A regulatory provision adopted under this section must not cause the immovable to be enclosed, or provide access, from that immovable, only to a public road situated in the territory of another municipality, or cause a no-access servitude acquired by the Minister of Transport to be inoperative or reduce the effect of the servitude, without the authorization of that Minister.
2005, c. 6, s. 68.
69. A local municipality may project snow that covers a public road onto adjoining private land.
2005, c. 6, s. 69.
70. A local municipality may maintain a private road open to the public by permission of the owner or occupant, on a request by a majority of the owners or occupants of the abutting property.
2005, c. 6, s. 70.
71. A contract under which a local municipality entrusts a person with the responsibility for converting its public lighting network and administering and maintaining the network during the period determined in the contract may also stipulate that that person is responsible for financing the cost for the municipality of acquiring the network and for reimbursing the cost through the fees the municipality pays that person in instalments the size and number of which are determined in the contract.
The Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply to work carried out under a contract entered into in accordance with the first paragraph.
2005, c. 6, s. 71.
72. A private road open to public traffic for 10 years or more becomes the property of the local municipality upon the observance of the following formalities:
(1)  the municipality approves by resolution a description, based on the cadastre in force, of the private road to which it proposes to apply this section;
(2)  a copy of the description, certified by a land surveyor, is filed with the office of the municipality;
(3)  the municipality has a notice published in the Gazette officielle du Québec and in a daily newspaper in the territory of the municipality twice, with an interval of not less than three months and not more than four months between publications. The notice contains
(a)  the full text of this section;
(b)  a summary description of the private road concerned;
(c)  a declaration that the formalities prescribed by subparagraphs 1 and 2 have been observed.
The municipality submits to the Minister responsible for the cadastre a cadastral plan showing the private road that has become its property because of this section. In addition, in the case of a plan involving a renumbering, the municipality must give notice of the deposit to any person whose address has been registered, but the consent of the creditors or the beneficiary of a declaration of family residence is not required in order to obtain the new cadastral numbering.
A right that third parties might claim to the ownership of the site of the private road in question is prescribed unless the appropriate recourse is exercised before the competent court within one year after the last publication in the Gazette officielle du Québec.
The municipality cannot apply this section to a private road on which it has levied a tax within the preceding 10 years.
2005, c. 6, s. 72.
73. If a local municipality notes that the site of an existing public road is not in conformity with the titles, it approves by resolution a description of the land prepared by a land surveyor that corresponds to that site and is based on the cadastre in force.
A copy of the description, certified by a land surveyor, must be filed with the office of the municipality.
The municipality sends a notice to any owner of the land concerned and any holder of another real right in the land, by any means providing evidence that it was sent,
(1)  identifying the land to which the resolution provided for in the first paragraph applies, using the name of the public road concerned wherever possible;
(2)  identifying the resolution approving the description of the land and mentioning its date and the fact that the site of the land is based on that description; and
(3)  reproducing the text of section 74 and making the necessary links with the purpose of the notice.
The land to which the resolution provided for in the first paragraph applies becomes the property of the municipality on the date the notice provided for in the third paragraph is sent. The municipality submits to the Minister responsible for the cadastre a cadastral plan showing the land that has become its property because of this section. In addition, in the case of a plan involving a renumbering, the municipality must give notice of the deposit to any person whose address has been registered, but the consent of the creditors or the beneficiary of a declaration of family residence is not required in order to obtain the new cadastral numbering.
2005, c. 6, s. 73.
74. A real right that could be asserted in respect of land that is the subject of a description referred to in section 73 is extinguished as of the sending of the notice provided for in that section.
The holder of a real right extinguished under the first paragraph may, however, claim an indemnity from the municipality as compensation for the loss of the right. Failing an agreement, the amount of the indemnity is determined by the Administrative Tribunal of Québec on the application of the person claiming the indemnity or the municipality, and sections 58 to 68 of the Expropriation Act (chapter E-24) apply, with the necessary modifications.
The right to the indemnity under the second paragraph is prescribed three years after the notice is sent in accordance with section 73.
2005, c. 6, s. 74.
75. When a public road is divided by the boundary of two local municipalities in such a way that a single municipality must be responsible for managing that road, the municipalities concerned must enter into an intermunicipal agreement.
2005, c. 6, s. 75.
76. If the municipalities fail to enter into an agreement under section 75, either one may request that the Minister appoint an arbitrator to rule on whether the management of the parts of the public road concerned need be the responsibility of a single municipality, decide, if necessary, which municipality is to be responsible and prescribe rules for the sharing of expenses.
As soon as possible after the adoption of the resolution setting out the request, the municipality making the request must forward a certified copy of it to the other municipality.
The arbitrator appointed under the first paragraph may, after hearing the parties, either rule that there is no need for a single municipality to be responsible for the management of the parts of the public road concerned or rule that uniform management is necessary, decide which municipality is to be responsible and prescribe rules for the sharing of expenses. The arbitrator may issue any other order necessary to preserve the rights of the parties.
The arbitrator’s decision ceases to have effect if the two municipalities reach an agreement under section 75.
Articles 944 to 944.10 and 945.1 to 945.8 of the Code of Civil Procedure (chapter C-25) apply, with the necessary modifications, to the arbitration referred to in the third paragraph.
The arbitrator’s remuneration is determined by the Minister. The costs of the arbitration are divided equally among the municipalities, unless the arbitrator decides otherwise, giving reasons.
2005, c. 6, s. 76.
77. Sections 75 and 76 apply, with the necessary modifications, to a public road that runs along the boundary of two local municipalities.
2005, c. 6, s. 77.
78. Work done to construct or reconstruct a sidewalk must facilitate access to the sidewalk by handicapped persons within the meaning of the Act to secure handicapped persons in the exercise of their rights with a view to achieving social, school and workplace integration (chapter E-20.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 78.
DIVISION II
PARKING
79. A local municipality may regulate parking by by-law.
In exercising its power under the first paragraph and after obtaining the consent of the owner, the local municipality may determine the private parking areas to which the by-law applies.
2005, c. 6, s. 79.
80. A local municipality may, by by-law, regulate the towing and impounding of vehicles parked in violation of a regulatory provision adopted under this Act or the Highway Safety Code (chapter C-24.2), set the tariff of towing or removal costs, and prescribe who is to pay the costs.
2005, c. 6, s. 80.
81. A person authorized by a local municipality to enforce its parking by-laws may move a vehicle or have it moved and store it, at the owner’s expense, for the purposes of maintenance work or in other cases determined by by-law by the municipality.
2005, c. 6, s. 81.
DIVISION III
PORT AND AIRPORT FACILITIES
82. A local municipality may regulate access to its port and airport facilities.
2005, c. 6, s. 82.
83. A local municipality may also establish, acquire and operate a port or airport facility outside its territory after notifying the municipality that has jurisdiction over the territory concerned.
2005, c. 6, s. 83.
84. A local municipality may entrust a person with the operation of its port or airport facilities.
A contract under the first paragraph may also stipulate that the person must finance any work carried out under the contract. In that case, the Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply.
2005, c. 6, s. 84; 2005, c. 50, s. 111.
CHAPTER X
OTHER POWERS
85. In addition to the regulatory powers under this Act, a local municipality may adopt a by-law to ensure peace, order, good government, and the general welfare of its citizens.
2005, c. 6, s. 85.
86. A local municipality may, by by-law, regulate the use of vehicles or trailers for housing or commercial purposes.
2005, c. 6, s. 86.
87. A local municipality may adopt by-laws
(1)  to regulate the burial and disinterment of bodies; and
(2)  to regulate the establishment of cemeteries.
2005, c. 6, s. 87.
88. A local municipality may agree to administer a cemetery under an agreement with the cemetery administrator.
2005, c. 6, s. 88.
89. A local municipality may have bodies interred in violation of the law removed, close a cemetery, and have bodies removed from the cemetery.
2005, c. 6, s. 89.
CHAPTER XI
GENERAL PROVISIONS
90. In addition to the financial assistance otherwise provided for, a local municipality may grant any assistance it considers appropriate with respect to the matters referred to in sections 4 and 85 to 89.
It may also contribute financially to the costs of moving or burying an electric power distribution or telecommunications system.
The Municipal Aid Prohibition Act (chapter I-15) does not apply to assistance granted
(1)  for the establishment or operation of a convention centre or an exhibition centre;
(2)  to a non-profit body that provides technical support to an enterprise situated in its territory;
(3)  to the owner of an immovable to help the owner comply with the obligation to install an apparatus intended to reduce the risk of malfunction of a water supply system or sewer system and keep the apparatus in good working order;
(4)  for damage to property caused by persons riotously or tumultuously assembled;
(5)  to the owner of a dwelling or a building to cover the cost of installing a fire alarm, a fire extinguishing or fire fighting apparatus, or a fire escape;
(6)  under the second paragraph; or
(7)  under section 13.1.
2005, c. 6, s. 90; 2005, c. 50, s. 112.
91. In addition, a local municipality may grant assistance in the following matters:
(1)  assistance to disadvantaged natural persons or natural persons in need;
(2)  the undertaking and furtherance, in or outside its territory, of education, cultural activities, youth training, works of charity and any action for the general welfare;
(3)  the operation of a health care institution; and
(4)  agriculture.
In exercising the power under subparagraph 1 of the first paragraph, a local municipality may establish shelters.
2005, c. 6, s. 91.
92. A local municipality may, by by-law, establish a program under which it grants subsidies or tax credits to professional artists within the meaning of the Act respecting the professional status of artists in the visual arts, arts and crafts and literature, and their contracts with promoters (chapter S-32.01) and to artists within the meaning of the Act respecting the professional status and conditions of engagement of performing, recording and film artists (chapter S-32.1). A legal person controlled by such an artist or a group of such artists that is not a legal person is eligible under the program in place of the artist who controls the legal person or the artists who make up the group.
A local municipality may, by by-law, establish an environmental restoration program and grant a subsidy for work on an immovable consistent with that program. The amount of the subsidy must not exceed the actual cost of the work. With the consent of the owner, the municipality may carry out any work required on an immovable under such a program.
In exercising the power to grant assistance under this Act, a local municipality may also establish any other assistance program.
The first and second paragraphs apply despite the Municipal Aid Prohibition Act (chapter I-15).
2005, c. 6, s. 92.
93. A local municipality may establish a body for the following purposes:
(1)  industrial, commercial or tourism promotion;
(2)  organization and promotion of cultural and recreational activities; and
(3)  environmental protection.
It may entrust to the bodies referred to in the first paragraph the organization and management of activities relating to the purposes they pursue.
2005, c. 6, s. 93.
94. A local municipality may entrust a non-profit partnership or legal person with the organization and management, on behalf of the local municipality, of activities or bodies referred to in subparagraph 1 or 3 of the first paragraph of section 93.
A local municipality may entrust a person with the organization and management, on behalf of the local municipality, of activities or bodies referred to in subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph of section 93.
2005, c. 6, s. 94; 2005, c. 50, s. 113.
95. A local municipality may install any equipment or device on an immovable or do any work on the immovable necessary for the exercise of its powers.
For the purposes of the first paragraph, the employees of the municipality or the persons it authorizes may enter or move about on any immovable at any reasonable time.
The exercise of the powers granted under this section is subject, however, to the restoration of the premises to their former state and to compensation of the owner or person in charge of the premises for any damage. In addition, the municipality is bound, except in an emergency, to give the owner or any other person in charge of the immovable prior notice of at least 48 hours of its intention to enter or move about on the immovable for the purposes mentioned in the first paragraph.
2005, c. 6, s. 95.
96. An amount owed to the municipality following its intervention under this Act is considered a property tax if the claim is related to an immovable and if the debtor is the owner of the immovable. Otherwise, the claim is considered a non-property tax.
2005, c. 6, s. 96.
97. The resolution by which a local municipality alienates a public utility must be approved by the qualified voters and the Government.
The first paragraph does not apply when the acquirer of the utility is another municipality, an intermunicipal board or a supramunicipal body within the meaning of sections 18 and 19 of the Act respecting the Pension Plan of Elected Municipal Officers (chapter R-9.3).
2005, c. 6, s. 97.
TITLE III
POWERS OF A REGIONAL COUNTY MUNICIPALITY
CHAPTER I
GENERAL PROVISIONS
98. A local municipality whose territory is not included in that of a regional county municipality is considered to be a regional county municipality for the purposes of this Title, with the necessary modifications.
2005, c. 6, s. 98.
99. A regional county municipality may make by-laws on any regional matter relating to its citizens that is not otherwise regulated.
2005, c. 6, s. 99.
100. The Municipal Aid Prohibition Act (chapter I-15) does not apply to assistance granted under sections 122 to 126.1.
2005, c. 6, s. 100; 2005, c. 50, s. 114.
CHAPTER II
POWERS EXERCISED CONCURRENTLY WITH A LOCAL MUNICIPALITY
101. A regional county municipality may exercise the powers set out in section 9 and paragraph 1 of section 10 as regards a railway siding, sections 11, 17, 82 to 84 and 88, section 91, the first and third paragraphs of section 92, and sections 93 and 94, with the necessary modifications.
Sections 5 and 6, section 81 as regards a regional park, the fourth paragraph of section 92 and section 96 apply to regional county municipalities, with the necessary modifications.
A regional county municipality may adopt non-regulatory measures with regard to railway sidings or port or airport facilities. However, it may only delegate a power in those matters to the extent provided for by law.
2005, c. 6, s. 101; 2005, c. 50, s. 115.
102. A regional county municipality may grant assistance
(1)  to a person for the establishment and operation in or outside its territory of equipment and public places for cultural, recreational and community activities;
(2)  to a partnership or legal person devoted to the pursuit of the purposes mentioned in paragraph 1 of this section, subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph of section 91 or the first paragraph of section 93.
2005, c. 6, s. 102.
CHAPTER III
EXCLUSIVE POWERS OF A REGIONAL COUNTY MUNICIPALITY
DIVISION I
WATERCOURSES AND LAKES
§ 1.  — Watercourses
103. A regional county municipality has jurisdiction over continuously or intermittently flowing watercourses, including those artificially created or modified, except
(1)  watercourses or parts of watercourses that the Government determines, after consultation with the Minister of Sustainable Development, Environment and Parks, by an order in council that comes into force on the date of its publication in the Gazette officielle du Québec or any later date specified in the order;
(2)  a ditch along a public road;
(3)  a common ditch within the meaning of article 1002 of the Civil Code; and
(4)  a drainage ditch
(a)  used solely for drainage or irrigation;
(b)  that was artificially created; and
(c)  the watershed of which has an area of less than 100 hectares.
The part of a watercourse used as a ditch remains under the jurisdiction of the regional county municipality.
2005, c. 6, s. 103.
104. A regional county municipality may adopt by-laws to regulate matters relating to water flow in watercourses, including crosspieces, obstructions and nuisances.
If a person does not carry out work required by a by-law under the first paragraph, the regional county municipality may carry it out at the person’s expense.
2005, c. 6, s. 104.
105. If informed of the presence in a watercourse of an obstacle that threatens the safety of persons or property, a regional county municipality must carry out the work required to restore normal water flow.
An employee designated by a regional county municipality for that purpose may immediately withdraw from a watercourse any obstructions that prevent or hamper normal water flow, without prejudice to the municipality’s right to recover the costs relating to their withdrawal from any person responsible for their presence.
2005, c. 6, s. 105.
106. A regional county municipality may carry out work to create, improve or maintain a watercourse. The work may be carried out in the bed or on the banks of the watercourse or on the land bordering on them.
2005, c. 6, s. 106.
107. The owner or occupant of land must allow the employees or representatives of the regional county municipality access to the watercourse for the inspections necessary in the performance of their duties. The owner or occupant must also allow machinery and equipment any access required to carry out work.
Before undertaking work, a regional county municipality must give the owner or occupant of the land at least 48 hours’ prior notice of its intention to move about on that land, unless prevented from doing so by the urgent need to remedy the situation.
The regional county municipality is bound to restore the premises to their original state and to pay compensation for any damage caused by its intervention.
2005, c. 6, s. 107.
108. A regional county municipality may assign the enforcement of the by-laws, the recovery of claims and the management of the work provided for in this subdivision to a local municipality in its territory by an agreement made in accordance with Section XXV of Chapter II of Title XIV of the Municipal Code of Québec (chapter C-27.1).
Section 107 applies, with the necessary modifications, to a local municipality and to its employees and representatives to whom a function is assigned under the first paragraph.
2005, c. 6, s. 108.
109. A watercourse linking or separating the territory of two or more regional county municipalities is under the joint jurisdiction of those regional county municipalities. Joint jurisdiction is exercised under an agreement or through the board of delegates, as the regional county municipalities concerned choose. Failing an agreement on the exercise of the joint jurisdiction within 60 days of the sending of a notice for that purpose by one regional county municipality to the other regional county municipalities concerned, jurisdiction is exercised through the board of delegates.
The board of delegates possesses and exercises all the powers of a regional county municipality regarding that watercourse.
2005, c. 6, s. 109.
§ 2.  — Lakes
110. A regional county municipality may carry out work to regulate the water level of a lake and do bed maintenance work.
Sections 107 and 108 apply, with the necessary modifications.
2005, c. 6, s. 110.
DIVISION II
POWER
111. A regional county municipality may form a limited partnership with a private-sector enterprise for the purpose of producing electric power by harnessing wind energy or a hydro-electric power.
The private-sector enterprise must at all times provide at least half of the contribution to the common stock of the partnership, and must be the partnership’s general partner.
2005, c. 6, s. 111; 2005, c. 50, s. 116.
111.1. If the regional county municipality wishes to form a partnership referred to in section 111, it must pass a resolution announcing its intention to do so. A copy of the resolution must be served on each local municipality whose territory is included in that of the regional county municipality.
At least 45 days after the service of the resolution required under the first paragraph, the regional county municipality may form the partnership.
2005, c. 50, s. 116.
111.2. With the authorization of the Minister, a regional county municipality that formed a partnership referred to in section 111 may stand surety for it.
Section 111.1 applies, with the necessary modifications, to the suretyship provided for in the first paragraph.
Before giving the authorization, the Minister may order the regional county municipality to submit the decision authorizing the suretyship to the approval of the qualified voters in the local municipalities that must contribute to the payment of the expenditures relating to the partnership.
The Act respecting elections and referendums in municipalities (chapter E-2.2) applies, with the necessary modifications, to the approval provided for in the third paragraph.
2005, c. 50, s. 116.
111.3. The total amount of the contribution and the surety bond provided by the regional county municipality under sections 111 and 111.2 may not exceed the amount required to set up a wind farm with a generating capacity of 50 megawatts or a hydro-electric power station with a generating capacity of 50 megawatts provided by hydraulic power in the domain of the State, depending on the case.
Furthermore, the total amount of the contributions and the surety bonds provided by all the regional county municipalities and local municipalities for a partnership described in section 111 may not exceed half of the contribution made to the common stock of the partnership.
2005, c. 50, s. 116.
111.4. If a municipality referred to in any of sections 4 to 6, 8 or 9 of the Act respecting the exercise of certain municipal powers in certain urban agglomerations (chapter E-20.001) could, under section 98, exercise a power provided for in section 111 or 111.2, that power is to be exercised by the central municipality within the meaning of section 15 of that Act and is considered an agglomeration power.
2005, c. 50, s. 116.
DIVISION III
REGIONAL PARKS
112. A regional county municipality may, by by-law, determine the location of a regional park, whether or not it is the owner of the land. Before the by-law is passed, the regional county municipality must give notice and post the notice in accordance with the fourth paragraph of article 445 of the Municipal Code of Québec (chapter C-27.1).
In the by-law referred to in the first paragraph, the regional county municipality may mention the local municipalities that may not exercise the right of withdrawal granted by the third paragraph of section 188 of the Act respecting land use planning and development (chapter A-19.1) as regards the exercise of the powers provided for in this section and in sections 113 to 120. In the case of a local municipality that exercised the right of withdrawal as regards those powers before the coming into force of the by-law, it may also indicate the date on which the withdrawal ends. As of that date, the representative of the local municipality again participates in the deliberations of the council of the regional county municipality that concern the exercise of those powers.
The by-law referred to in the first paragraph is without effect for third persons as long as the regional county municipality is not the owner of the land or has not made an agreement with the owner of the land or, in the case of land in the domain of the State, with the person having authority over the land, allowing it to operate the park.
2005, c. 6, s. 112.
113. As of the coming into force of a by-law under section 112, the regional county municipality may make an agreement with a person holding a right of ownership or any other right in an immovable situated in the park concerned.
2005, c. 6, s. 113.
114. The regional county municipality may take any non-regulatory measure relating to regional parks. However, a regional county municipality may only assign a power to the extent set out in sections 116 and 117.
2005, c. 6, s. 114.
115. As regards a regional park, the regional county municipality may adopt by-laws on any matter relating to
(1)  park administration and operation;
(2)  the protection and conservation of nature;
(3)  user safety;
(4)  the use or parking of vehicles;
(5)  the possession or keeping of animals;
(6)  the posting of information;
(7)  the operation of businesses;
(8)  recreational activities; and
(9)  any use of a public road not covered by the regulatory powers conferred on it by the Highway Safety Code (chapter C-24.2).
2005, c. 6, s. 115.
116. The regional county municipality may establish or operate a sleeping-accommodation, catering or commercial establishment or a parking lot in a regional park.
The regional county municipality may entrust a person with the operation of an establishment or parking lot referred to in the first paragraph.
A contract under the second paragraph may also stipulate that the person must finance any work carried out under the contract. In that case, the Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply.
2005, c. 6, s. 116; 2005, c. 50, s. 117.
117. The regional county municipality may entrust a person with the operation of its regional park.
It may also entrust that person with the exercise of the power under section 113.
A contract under the first paragraph may also stipulate that the person must finance the work carried out under the contract. In that case, the Municipal Works Act (chapter T-14) does not apply.
2005, c. 6, s. 117; 2005, c. 50, s. 117.
118. If the person referred to in section 117 is a non-profit body, the regional county municipality may stand surety for it. However, it must obtain the authorization of the Minister to stand surety for an obligation of $50,000 or more.
Before giving the authorization, the Minister may order the regional county municipality to submit the decision authorizing the surety to the approval of the persons qualified to vote in the local municipalities that must contribute to the payment of the expenditures relating to the regional park.
The Act respecting elections and referendums in municipalities (chapter E-2.2) applies, with the necessary modifications, to the approval sought under the second paragraph.
The regional county municipality may also grant subsidies to the person referred to in the first paragraph.
2005, c. 6, s. 118; 2005, c. 50, s. 118.
119. Articles 935 to 936.3 and 938 to 938.4 of the Municipal Code of Québec (chapter C-27.1), on the awarding of contracts, apply to the person referred to in section 117, with the necessary modifications.
The person is deemed to be a regional county municipality for the purposes of the regulation made under article 938.0.1 of the Code.
2005, c. 6, s. 119; 2005, c. 50, s. 119.
120. The regional county municipality, a local municipality or a metropolitan community may make an agreement with respect to parks in accordance with Section XXV of Chapter II of Title XIV of the Municipal Code of Québec (chapter C-27.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 120.
121. If a local municipality that is considered to be a regional county municipality exercises the power provided for in the first paragraph of section 118, subsection 3 of section 28 of the Cities and Towns Act (chapter C-19) or article 9 of the Municipal Code of Québec (chapter C-27.1) applies, as the case may be.
The first paragraph applies despite the first three paragraphs of section 118.
2005, c. 6, s. 121; 2005, c. 50, s. 120.
DIVISION IV
REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
122. A regional county municipality may grant technical assistance to a private-sector enterprise by providing it with the services of an economic development agent.
2005, c. 6, s. 122.
123. A regional county municipality may grant assistance to a non-profit body that provides technical support to an enterprise situated in its territory.
2005, c. 6, s. 123.
124. A regional county municipality must provide financial support to the local development centre operating in its territory commensurate with the contributions collected for that purpose from the local municipalities in the territory.
2005, c. 6, s. 124.
125. A regional county municipality may give or lend money to an investment fund intended to provide financial support to enterprises in a start-up or developmental phase.
The fund must be administered by a non-profit body established for that purpose.
The resolution must indicate the maximum contribution the regional county municipality may make to the fund. The amount it may commit under this section may not exceed $500,000.
2005, c. 6, s. 125.
126. A regional county municipality may establish a fund to provide financial support for operations to develop land or forest resources in the domain of the State or private land or forest resources.
This fund must be administered by the regional county municipality. The regional county municipality may delegate to a person all or part of the administration of the fund.
In addition to the sums provided for in article 14.16 of the Municipal Code of Québec (chapter C-27.1) or section 29.18 of the Cities and Towns Act (chapter C-19), the fund receives, in particular, the sums paid into it pursuant to a forest management contract entered into in accordance with Division II of Chapter IV of Title I of the Forest Act (chapter F-4.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 126.
126.1. A regional county municipality may acquire a financial interest in a development fund created in its territory as part of the FIER-Regions or the Support Funds component of the government program known as the Regional Economic Intervention Fund (FIER).
The interest mentioned in the first paragraph may, in particular, be in the form of a loan or an investment made by subscribing to shares of the capital stock or the common stock of a limited partnership formed to administer the fund.
2005, c. 50, s. 121.
TITLE IV
AMENDING PROVISIONS
AGRICULTURAL ABUSES ACT
127. (Amendment integrated into c. A-2, s. 6).
2005, c. 6, s. 127.
128. (Amendment integrated into c. A-2, s. 7).
2005, c. 6, s. 128.
ACT RESPECTING LAND USE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
129. (Amendment integrated into c. A-19.1, s. 85).
2005, c. 6, s. 129.
130. (Amendment integrated into c. A-19.1, s. 85.0.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 130.
131. (Amendment integrated into c. A-19.1, ss. 85.2-85.4).
2005, c. 6, s. 131.
132. (Amendment integrated into c. A-19.1, s. 113).
2005, c. 6, s. 132.
133. (Amendment integrated into c. A-19.1, s. 119).
2005, c. 6, s. 133.
134. (Amendment integrated into c. A-19.1, Chapter V.0.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 134.
135. (Amendment integrated into c. A-19.1, s. 188).
2005, c. 6, s. 135.
CULTURAL PROPERTY ACT
136. (Amendment integrated into c. B-4, s. 60).
2005, c. 6, s. 136.
137. (Amendment integrated into c. B-4, Division IV.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 137.
CHARTER OF VILLE DE GATINEAU
138. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.1, s. 46).
2005, c. 6, s. 138.
139. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.1, Schedule B).
2005, c. 6, s. 139.
140. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.1, Schedule B).
2005, c. 6, s. 140.
141. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.1, Schedule B).
2005, c. 6, s. 141.
142. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.1, Schedule B).
2005, c. 6, s. 142.
CHARTER OF VILLE DE LÉVIS
143. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.2, s. 74).
2005, c. 6, s. 143.
144. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 144.
145. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.2, s. 82).
2005, c. 6, s. 145.
146. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.2, s. 92).
2005, c. 6, s. 146.
CHARTER OF VILLE DE LONGUEUIL
147. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.3, s. 60.2).
2005, c. 6, s. 147.
148. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.3, s. 61).
2005, c. 6, s. 148.
149. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.3, s. 69).
2005, c. 6, s. 149.
150. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.3, s. 78).
2005, c. 6, s. 150.
151. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.3, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 151.
152. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.3, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 152.
153. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.3, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 153.
CHARTER OF VILLE DE MONTRÉAL
154. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, s. 34.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 154.
155. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, s. 92).
2005, c. 6, s. 155.
156. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, s. 94).
2005, c. 6, s. 156.
157. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, s. 105).
2005, c. 6, s. 157.
158. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, s. 141).
2005, c. 6, s. 158.
159. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 159.
160. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 160.
161. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 161.
162. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 162.
163. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 163.
164. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 164.
165. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 165.
166. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 166.
167. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 167.
168. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 168.
169. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 169.
170. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 170.
171. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.4, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 171.
CHARTER OF VILLE DE QUÉBEC
172. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 76).
2005, c. 6, s. 172.
173. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 81).
2005, c. 6, s. 173.
174. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 82).
2005, c. 6, s. 174.
175. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 84).
2005, c. 6, s. 175.
176. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 85).
2005, c. 6, s. 176.
177. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 94).
2005, c. 6, s. 177.
178. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 95).
2005, c. 6, s. 178.
179. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 111).
2005, c. 6, s. 179.
180. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, s. 121).
2005, c. 6, s. 180.
181. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 181.
182. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 182.
183. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 183.
184. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 184.
185. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 185.
186. (Amendment integrated into c. C-11.5, Schedule C).
2005, c. 6, s. 186.
CITIES AND TOWNS ACT
187. (Amendment integrated into c. C-19, s. 28).
2005, c. 6, s. 187.
188. (Amendment integrated into c. C-19, s. 29.14.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 188.
189. (Amendment integrated into c. C-19, s. 29.18).
2005, c. 6, s. 189.
190. (Amendment integrated into c. C-19, s. 71).
2005, c. 6, s. 190.
191. (Amendment integrated into c. C-19, s. 465.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 191.
192. (Amendment integrated into c. C-19, ss. 468.32-468.32.2).
2005, c. 6, s. 192.
193. (Amendment integrated into c. C-19, s. 468.51).
2005, c. 6, s. 193.
194. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 194.
HIGHWAY SAFETY CODE
195. (Amendment integrated into c. C-24.2, s. 498).
2005, c. 6, s. 195.
196. (Amendment integrated into c. C-24.2, s. 626).
2005, c. 6, s. 196.
MUNICIPAL CODE OF QUÉBEC
197. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, aa. 6 and 6.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 197.
198. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 9).
2005, c. 6, s. 198.
199. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 14.12.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 199.
200. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 14.16).
2005, c. 6, s. 200.
201. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 14.18).
2005, c. 6, s. 201.
202. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 25).
2005, c. 6, s. 202.
203. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 207).
2005, c. 6, s. 203.
204. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 267.0.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 204.
205. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 440).
2005, c. 6, s. 205.
206. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, aa. 601-601.2).
2005, c. 6, s. 206.
207. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 620).
2005, c. 6, s. 207.
208. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 678).
2005, c. 6, s. 208.
209. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 678.0.3).
2005, c. 6, s. 209.
210. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 711.2).
2005, c. 6, s. 210.
211. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 724).
2005, c. 6, s. 211.
212. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 934).
2005, c. 6, s. 212.
213. (Amendment integrated into c. C-27.1, a. 1103).
2005, c. 6, s. 213.
214. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 214.
PEDDLERS ACT
215. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 215.
ACT RESPECTING THE COMMUNAUTÉ MÉTROPOLITAINE DE MONTRÉAL
216. (Amendment integrated into c. C-37.01. s. 159.19).
2005, c. 6, s. 216.
JAMES BAY REGION DEVELOPMENT AND MUNICIPAL ORGANIZATION ACT
221. (Amendment integrated into c. D-8.2, s. 35).
2005, c. 6, s. 221.
ACT RESPECTING ADMINISTRATIVE JUSTICE
222. (Amendment integrated into c. J-3, Schedule II).
2005, c. 6, s. 222.
ACT RESPECTING THE MINISTÈRE DE L’AGRICULTURE, DES PÊCHERIES ET DE L’ALIMENTATION
223. (Amendment integrated into c. M-14, s. 22.1).
2005, c. 6, s. 223.
ACT RESPECTING THE PRESERVATION OF AGRICULTURAL LAND AND AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES
224. (Amendment integrated into c. P-41.1, s. 1).
2005, c. 6, s. 224.
ENVIRONMENT QUALITY ACT
225. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 225.
226. (Amendment integrated into c. Q-2, s. 124).
2005, c. 6, s. 226.
ACT RESPECTING THE RÉGIE DU LOGEMENT
227. (Amendment integrated into c. R-8.1, s. 35).
2005, c. 6, s. 227.
WATERCOURSES ACT
228. (Amendment integrated into c. R-13, s. 69.2).
2005, c. 6, s. 228.
ACT RESPECTING MUNICIPAL AND PRIVATE ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS
229. (Amendment integrated into c. S-41, s. 2).
2005, c. 6, s. 229.
230. (Amendment integrated into c. S-41, s. 3).
2005, c. 6, s. 230.
231. (Amendment integrated into c. S-41, s. 5).
2005, c. 6, s. 231.
232. (Amendment integrated into c. S-41, s. 7).
2005, c. 6, s. 232.
233. (Amendment integrated into c. S-41, s. 12).
2005, c. 6, s. 233.
234. (Amendment integrated into c. S-41, s. 13).
2005, c. 6, s. 234.
235. (Amendment integrated into c. S-41, s. 15).
2005, c. 6, s. 235.
ACT RESPECTING OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLES
238. (Amendment integrated into c. V-1.2, s. 8).
2005, c. 6, s. 238.
ACT RESPECTING SALES OF MUNICIPAL PUBLIC UTILITIES
239. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 239.
ACT RESPECTING ROADS
240. (Amendment integrated into c. V-9, s. 2).
2005, c. 6, s. 240.
241. (Amendment integrated into c. V-9, s. 3).
2005, c. 6, s. 241.
242. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 242.
243. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 243.
ACT RESPECTING THE EXERCISE OF CERTAIN MUNICIPAL POWERS IN CERTAIN URBAN AGGLOMERATIONS
244. (Amendment integrated into c. E-20.001, s. 19).
2005, c. 6, s. 244.
TITLE V
MISCELLANEOUS, TRANSITIONAL AND FINAL PROVISIONS
245. No provision of an Act or an order made under the Act respecting municipal territorial organization (chapter O-9) and governing the powers of a particular municipality, in force on 1 January 2006, may operate to restrict the scope of a power granted by this Act.
2005, c. 6, s. 245.
246. In the Acts and the statutory instruments under them, a reference to a provision repealed or replaced by this Act is a reference to the corresponding provision of this Act.
2005, c. 6, s. 246.
247. Municipal roads that existed on 2 November 1871 may retain the width they had on 17 June 2004, even though that width may be less than required by the law under which those roads were established.
2005, c. 6, s. 247.
248. Subject to the third paragraph, the by-laws, resolutions, minutes, agreements and other acts that were adopted in accordance with a provision replaced or repealed by this Act remain in force or continue to have effect until they are amended, replaced or repealed or until their purposes are achieved.
Any act referred to in the first paragraph may be amended, replaced or repealed by resolution if the purpose of the act is not a regulatory measure.
The by-laws, minutes and deeds of agreement concerning roads, bridges and watercourses may not be amended or replaced. They may be repealed by resolution.
2005, c. 6, s. 248; 2005, c. 50, s. 123.
249. A local municipality has 24 months as of 1 January 2006 to adopt a by-law relating to a matter referred to in articles 250 to 267 of the Municipal Code of Québec (chapter C-27.1) or section 438 of the Cities and Towns Act (chapter C-19), as they read on 23 May 2005, the substance of which has been preserved in the form of a regulatory power by this Act. In the meantime, those sections continue to have effect.
2005, c. 6, s. 249.
249.1. Until the coming into force of section 237 of this Act, a local municipality whose territory is not served by a public transit authority or another public body providing public transport that offers paratransit services must, by resolution, a copy of which must be sent to the Minister of Transport, enter into a contract to make paratransit available within its territory. The nature of the measures to be implemented for the purposes of this section must be described in the resolution.
2005, c. 50, s. 124.
250. The Minister of Municipal Affairs and Regions is responsible for the administration of this Act.
2005, c. 6, s. 250.
251. (Omitted).
2005, c. 6, s. 251; 2005, c. 50, s. 125.