S-2.1, r. 11 - Regulation respecting the quality of the work environment

Full text
chapter S-2.1, r. 11
Regulation respecting the quality of the work environment
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY — QUALITY OF THE WORK ENVIRONMENT
Act respecting occupational health and safety
(chapter S-2.1, s. 223)
S-2.1
Environment Quality Act
(chapter Q-2)
Q-2
September 1 2012
DIVISION I
INTERPRETATION
1. Definitions: In this Regulation, unless the context indicates otherwise,
(0.a)  “asbestos” means the fibrous form of mineral silicates belonging to rock-forming minerals of the serpentine group, that is, chrysotile, and the amphibole group, that is, actinolite, amosite, anthophyllite, crocidolite, tremolite or any mixture containing one or more of those minerals:
(a)  “predominant frequency band” means a frequency band whose level passes through a maximum that exceeds the arithmetic average of the levels of the preceding and following octave bands by 4 dB or more, and for the bands at the upper and lower limits of the sound spectrum, whose level exceeds that of the contiguous octave band by 5 dB;
(b)  “continuous noise” means a steady noise including a noise caused by mechanical shocks of solid bodies or by impulses repeated at a frequency greater than one per second;
(c)  “impact noise” means any noise caused by mechanical shocks of solid bodies or by impulses repeated or not repeated at a frequency greater than or equal to one per second;
(d)  “construction site” means any place where foundation, construction, erection, maintenance, renovation, repair, alteration or demolition work is carried out with respect to a building, or of civil engineering works, on and at the site itself, including the preparatory work of land clearing;
(d.1)  “containing asbestos” means containing an asbestos concentration of at least 0.1%;
(e)  “heat stress” means heat unbalance in a worker caused by working in a hot environment;
(f)  “dB” means a dimensionless unit used to express in logarithmic form the relation existing between a measured quantity and a reference value which, when applied to sound pressure, is established in accordance with section 3 of publication No. 179 (second edition, 1973) of the Central Office of the International Electrotechnical Commission;
(g)  “dBA” means the value of the overall sound level measured on the A scale established in accordance with the standards and methods prescribed in publication No. 179 (second edition, 1973) of the Central Office of the International Electrotechnical Commission;
(h)  “corrected dBA” means the sound level expressed in dBA after an increase in the measured level of the predominant frequency band;
(i)  “dB linear” means the overall sound level measured in such a way that the various frequencies of the sound spectrum are in no way attenuated;
(j)  “establishment” means any immovable or part of an immovable where persons may stay to do work or art, used for industrial, commercial, energy, or office purposes or used as a workshop, laboratory or indoor shooting range, except a family farm operation in which only the members of a specific family are employed;
(j.1)  “respirable asbestos fibre” means asbestos fibre having a diameter of less than 3 µm and a ratio of length to diameter of more than 3:1. Only fibres longer than 5 µm are taken into account for measurement purposes;
(j.2)  “high-efficiency filter” means a filter capable of filtering particles 0.3 µm in size at an efficiency rate of at least 99.97%;
(k)  “Act” means the Environment Quality Act (chapter Q-2);
(k.1)  “friable material” means material that can be crumbled, pulverized or powdered by hand pressure when dry or that is crumbled, pulverized or powdered;
(l)  “work location” means any place, including a vehicle, except when used for agricultural purposes, utilized by a worker to accomplish his work;
(m)  “stationary work location” means any work location in which a worker is required to perform his duties for at least 4 hours of his working day over a usual work surface of 30 m3 or less;
(m.1)  “asbestos dust” means airborne asbestos particles or deposited asbestos particles liable to become airborne in the work area;
(n)  “air recirculation” means local exhaust ventilation, filtering of the air and redistribution of the filtered air in a work area;
(o)  “washroom” means any room containing one or several toilets, urinals, sinks or showers to meet the sanitary needs of the workers of an establishment;
(p)  “peak value” means the maximum level reached by a sound wave;
(q)  “respiratory zone” means a hemisphere having a 300 mm radius extending in front of the face and measured from the midpoint of an imaginary line joining the ears.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 1; O.C. 55-90, s. 2; O.C. 1248-94, s. 1.
DIVISION II
ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
2. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 2; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
3. Scope: This Regulation applies to:
(a)  any establishment constructed or brought into operation after 19 December 1979;
(b)  any rearrangement or modification of an existing establishment that may affect one of the subjects treated in this Regulation; and
(c)  any enlargement of an existing establishment.
This Regulation also applies, effective from 19 December 1979, to establishments already constructed on that date, except for sections 18 and 53, which apply to those establishments effective from 30 June 1980, and sections 11, 22 and 37 that apply thereto effective from 30 June 1981. However, section 31 applies only to the cases specified in subparagraph a of the first paragraph.
This Regulation applies with the necessary modifications to new and existing construction sites, except sections 4, 14 to 16, 30 to 32, 41 to 43, 53, 58 and 67 and other provisions that exclude construction sites or any category thereof.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 3.
4. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 4; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION III
(Revoked)
R.R.Q. 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Div. III; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
5. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 5; O.C. 55-90, s. 3; O.C. 1248-94, s. 2; O.C. 459-99, s. 12; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
5.1. (Revoked).
O.C. 55-90, s. 4; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
5.2. (Revoked).
O.C. 1248-94, s. 3; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
6. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 6; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
7. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 7; O.C. 1248-94, s. 4; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
8. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 8; O.C. 1960-86, s. 3; O.C. 1248-94, s. 5; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
8.1. (Revoked).
O.C. 1248-94, s. 6; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
9. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 9; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
10. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 10; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
11. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 11; O.C. 55-90, s. 5; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
12. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 12; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
13. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 13; O.C. 55-90, s. 6; O.C. 1248-94, s. 7; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION IV
(Revoked)
R.R.Q. 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Div. IV; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
14. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 14; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
15. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 15; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
16. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 16; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
17. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 17; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
18. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 18; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
19. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 19; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
20. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 20; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
21. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 21; O.C. 55-90, s. 7; O.C. 1248-94, s. 8; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
22. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 22; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
23. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 23; O.C. 213-93, s. 542; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
24. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 24; O.C. 213-93, s. 543; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
25. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 25; O.C. 213-93, s. 544; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
26. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 26; O.C. 213-93, s. 545; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
27. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 27; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
28. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 28; O.C. 576-82, s. 2; O.C. 213-93, s. 546; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
29. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 29; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION V
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Div. V; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
30. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 30; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
31. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 31; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
32. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 32; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
33. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 33; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
34. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 34; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
35. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 35; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
36. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 36; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION VI
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Div. VI; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
37. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 37; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
38. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 38; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
39. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 39; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
40. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 40; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION VII
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Div. VII; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
41. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 41; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
42. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 42; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
43. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 43; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION VIII
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Div. VIII; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
44. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 44; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
45. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 45; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
46. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 46; O.C. 576-82, s. 3; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
47. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 47; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
48. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 48; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
49. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 49; O.C. 576-82, ss. 4 and 5; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
50. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 50; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
51. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 51; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
52. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 52; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
53. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 53; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
54. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 54; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
55. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 55; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION IX
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Div. IX; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
56. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 56; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
57. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 57; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
58. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 58; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
59. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 59; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
60. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 60; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
61. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 61; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
62. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 62; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
63. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 63; O.C. 213-93, s. 547; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
64. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 64; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
65. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 65; O.C. 213-93, s. 548; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
66. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 66; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
67. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 67; Erratum, 1984 G.O. 2, 3363; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
68. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 68; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
69. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 69; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
70. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 70; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
71. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 71; O.C. 213-93, s. 549.
72. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 72; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
73. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 73; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
74. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 74; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
75. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 75; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
DIVISION X
MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
76. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 76; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
77. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 77; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
77.1. (Revoked).
O.C. 55-90, s. 8; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
78. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 78; O.C. 55-90, s. 9; O.C. 1248-94, s. 9; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
78.1. (Revoked).
O.C. 55-90, s. 10; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
79. Choice of personal protective equipment: Where a health and safety parity committee exists in an establishment, the committee is responsible for choosing the personal protective equipment that the workers of the establishment will use pursuant to sections 45, 124, 136 and 137 of the Regulation respecting occupational health and safety (chapter S-2.1, r. 13) among the equipment that complies with the standards prescribed in the said sections.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 79; O.C. 885-2001, s. 380.
80. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 80; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
81. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, s. 81; O.C. 885-2001, s. 379.
SCHEDULE A
(ss. 5, 5.2, 11 and 21)
PERMISSIBLE EXPOSURE VALUES FOR GASES, DUSTS, FUMES, VAPOURS OR MISTS IN THE WORK ENVIRONMENT
Notes and Definitions
(1) TIME-WEIGHTED AVERAGE EXPOSURE VALUE:
The time-weighted average concentration for an 8-hour workday and a 40-hour workweek of a chemical substance (in the form of gases, dusts, fumes, vapours or mists) present in the air in a worker’s respiratory zone.
(2) SHORT-TERM EXPOSURE VALUE:
The 15-minute time-weighted average concentration for exposure to a chemical substance (in the form of gases, dusts, fumes, vapours or mists), present in the air in a worker’s respiratory zone which should not be exceeded at any time during a workday, even if the time-weighted average exposure value is not exceeded.
Exposures above the time-weighted average exposure value and below the short-term exposure value should not be longer than 15 consecutive minutes and should not occur more than 4 times per day. There should be at least 60 minutes between such exposures.
(3) EXCURSION LIMITS:
These limits apply to substances which do not have a short-term exposure value. Provided the time-weighted average exposure value is not exceeded, excursions in exposure levels may exceed 3 times that value for a cumulative period not exceeding a total of 30 minutes during a workday. Notwithstanding the foregoing, none of those excursions in exposure levels may exceed 5 times the time-weighted average exposure value during any length of time whatsoever.
(4) CEILING VALUE:
The ceiling value is indicated by the letter “C” preceding a time-weighted average exposure value. In such cases, the concentration specified should never be exceeded during any length of time whatsoever.
(5) SKIN:
The designation “Skin” in the remark column refers to the potential significant contribution to the overall exposure by the cutaneous route. Exposure is by contact with vapours or, of probable greater significance, by direct skin contact with the substance. The cutaneous route includes mucous membranes and the eyes.
(6) CARCINOGENS:
The designations under “carcinogen” in the Remark column refer to the following:
C1: carcinogenic effect detected in humans
C2: carcinogenic effect suspected in humans
C3: carcinogenic effect detected in animals. Results of studies relating to the carcinogenocity of these substances in animals are not necessarily applicable to humans.
(7) RESPIRABLE FIBRES (other than respirable asbestos fibres):
Objects longer than 5 µm having a diameter of less than 3 µm and a ratio of length to diameter of more than 3:1.
(8) PPM:
The expression “ppm” means “part per million” (parts of gas or vapour per million parts of airborne contaminants per volume measured at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa).
(9) MG/M3:
the expression “mg/m3” means “milligram per cubic metre” (milligram of substance per cubic metre of air).
(10) SIMPLE ASPHYXIANT:
A physiologically inert gas which acts primarily by displacing airborne oxygen and that can cause a decrease in the percentage in volume of airborne oxygen below the 19.5% provided for in section 7 and required to maintain blood oxygen saturation.
NOTES IN THE GENERAL TABLE:
Note 1 - The standard corresponds to dust containing no asbestos and < 1% of crystalline silica.
Note 2a - Permissible asbestos exposure values in number of respirable fibres per cm3.
Note 2b - Permissible recirculation concentration of asbestos respirable dust: 0.1 mg/m3.
Note 3 - Where the use of these products is permitted.
Note 4 - Permissible exposure values in number of respirable fibres per cm3.
PART IGeneral table
EXPOSURE VALUES FOR AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS

Time-weighted
average
exposure value Short-term
exposure
value

Remark
Substance [CAS#] ppm mg/m3 ppm mg/m3 Skin Carcinogen
Abate See Temephos
Acetaldehyde [75-07-0] 100 180 150 270 C3
Acetic acid [64-19-7] 10 25 15 37
Acetic anhydride [108-24-7] P5 P21
Acetone [67-64-1] 750 1780 1000 2380
Acetonitrile [75-05-8] 40 67 60 101
Acetylene [74-86-2] Simple asphyxiant
Acetylene dichloride See 1,2-Dichloroethylene
Acetylene tetrabromide See 1,1,2,2-Tetrabromoethane
Acetylsalicylic acid [50-78-2] 5
Acrolein [107-02-8] 0,1 0,23 0,3 0,69
Acrylamide [79-06-1] 0,03 X C2
Acrylic acid [79-10-7] 10 29 X
Acrylonitrile [107-13-1] 2 4,3 X C2
Actinolite See Asbestos
Aldrin [309-00-2] 0,25 X
Allyl alcohol [107-18-6] 2 4,8 4 9,5 X
Allyl chloride See 3-Chloropropene
Allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) [106-92-3] 5 23 10 47
Allyl propyl disulfide [2179-59-1] 2 12 3 18
Aluminum (as Al) [7429-90-5]
Alkyls (NOC)
Metal
Pyro powders
Soluble salts
Welding fumes 2
10
5
2
5
Aluminum oxide (as Al) [1344-28-1] 10 [total dust, note 1]
4-Aminodiphenyl [92-67-1] X C1
2-Aminoethanol [141-43-5] 3 7,5 6 15
2-Aminopyridine [504-29-0] 0,5 2,0
3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole See Amitrole
Amitrole [61-82-5] 0,2 C3
Ammonia [7664-41-7] 25 17 35 24
Ammonium chloride fume [12125-02-9] 10 20
Ammonium perfluorooctanoate [3825-26-1] 0,1
Ammonium sulfamate [7773-06-0] 10
Amosite See Asbestos
n-Amyl acetate [628-63-7] 100 532
sec-Amyl acetate [626-38-0] 125 665
Aniline [62-53-3] 2 7,6 X
o-Anisidine [90-04-0] 0,1 0,5 X C3
p-Anisidine [104-94-9] 0,1 0,5 X
Anthophyllite See Asbestos
Antimony [7440-36-0], metal and
compounds (as Sb)
0,5
Antimony trioxide (as Sb) [1309-64-4] 0,5 C3
Antimony trioxide, production
(as Sb) C2
ANTU (a-Naphthylthiourea) [86-88-4] 0,3
Argon [7440-37-1] Simple asphyxiant
Arsenic [7440-38-2], metal and soluble
compounds (as As) 0,2
Arsenic trioxide, production [1327-53-3] C2
Arsine [7784-42-1] 0,05 0,16
Asbestos (note 2a) (note 2b)
Actinolite
Amosite (note 3)
Anthophyllite
Chrysotile
Crocidolite (note 3)
Tremolite
[12172-67-7]
[12172-73-5]
[17068-78-9]
[12001-29-5]
[12001-28-4]
[14567-73-8]
1 fibre/cm
0,2 fibre/cm
1 fibre/cm
1 fibre/cm
0,2 fibre/cm
1 fibre/cm
5 fibres/cm3
1 fibre/cm3
5fibres/cm3
5 fibres/cm3
1 fibre/cm3
5 fibres/cm3
C1
C1
C1
C1
C1
C1
Asphalt (petroleum) fumes [8052-42-4] 5
Aspirin See Acetylsalicylic acid
Atrazine [1912-24-9] 5
Attapulgite See Fibres-Natural Mineral Fibres
Azimphos-methyl [86-50-0] 0,2 X
Barium [7440-39-3], soluble
compounds (as Ba)
0,5
Barium sulfate [7727-43-7] 10
5 [total dust, note 1]
[respirable dust, note 1]
Benomyl [17804-35-2] 0,84 10
Benzene [71-43-2] 1 3 5 15,5 C1
Benzidine (production) [92-87-5] X C1
Benzo(a)pyrene [50-32-8] 0,005 C2
p-Benzoquinone [106-51-4] 0,1 0,44
Benzoyl peroxide [94-36-0] 5
Benzyl chloride [100-44-7] 1 5,2
Beryllium [7440-41-7], metal and
compounds (as Be)
0,002
C2
Biphenyl [92-52-4] 0,2 1,3
Bismuth telluride (as Bi2Te3)
Se-doped
Undoped

[1304-82-1]
5
10
Borates, tetra, sodium salt
Anhydrous
Decahydrate
Pentahydrate
[1330-43-4]
[1303-96-4]
[12045-88-4]
1
5
1
Boron oxide [1303-86-2] 10
Boron tribromide [10294-33-4] P1 P10
Boron trifluoride [7637-07-02] P1 P2,8
Bromacil [314-40-9] 10
Bromine [7726-95-6] 0,1 0,66 0,3 2,0
Bromine pentafluoride [7789-30-2] 0,1 0,72
Bromochloromethane See Chlorobromethane
2-Bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-
trifluoroethane
See Halothane
Bromoethane See Ethyl bromide
Bromoethylene See Vinyl bromide
Bromoform [75-25-2] 0,5 5,2 X
Bromomethane See Methyl bromide
Bromotrifluoromethane [75-63-8] 1000 6090
1,3-Butadiene [106-99-0] 10 22 C2
Butane [106-97-8] 800 1900
Butanethiol See Butyl mercaptan
2-Butanone See Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)
2-Butoxyethanol [111-76-2]] 25 121 X
n-Butyl acetate [123-86-4] 150 713 200 950
sec-Butyl acetate [105-46-4] 200 950
tert-Butyl acetate [540-88-5] 200 950
n-Butyl acrylate [141-32-2] 10 52
n-Butyl alcohol [71-36-3] P50 P152 X
sec-Butyl alcohol [78-92-2] 100 303
tert-Butyl alcohol [75-65-0] 100 303 150 455
Butyl celloselve® See 2-Butoxy ethanol
tert-Butyl chromate (as Cr03) [1189-85-1] P0,1 X
n-Butyl glycidyl ether (BGE) [2426-08-6] 25 133
n-Butyl lactate [138-22-7] 5 30
Butyl mercaptan [109-79-5] 0,5 1,8
n-Butylamine [109-73-9] P5 P15 X
o-sec-Butylphenol [89-72-5] 5 31 X
p-tert-Butyltoluene [98-51-1] 10 61 20 122
Cadmium [7440-43-9], dusts and salts
(as Cd)
0,.05
C2
Cadmiun oxide
Fume (as Cd)
Production (as Cd) [1306-19-0]
P0,05
0,05
C2
C2
Calcium carbonate [1317-65-3] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Calcium cyanamide [156-62-7] 0,5
Calcium hydroxide [1305-62-0] 5
Calcium oxide [1305-78-8] 2
Calcium silicate (synthetic) [1344-95-2] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Calcium sulfate [1778-18-9] 10
5 [total dust, note 1]
[respirable dust, note 1]
Camphor (synthetic) [76-22-2] 2 12 3 19
Caprolactam
Dust
Vapour [105-60-2]

4,3
1
20

8,6
3
40
Captafol [2425-06-1] 0,1 X
Captan [133-06-2] 5
Carbaryl [63-25-2] 5
Carbofuran [1563-66-2] 0,1
Carbon black [1333-86-4] 3,5
Carbon dioxide [124-38-9] 5000 9000 30000 54000
Carbon disulfide [75-15-0] 4 12 12 36 X
Carbon monoxide [630-08-0] 35 40 200 230
Carbon tetrabromide [588-13-4] 0,1 1,4 0,3 4,1
Carbon tetrachloride [56-23-5] 5 31 X C2
Carbon, fibres See Fibres-Organic Synthetic Fibres
Carbonyl chloride See Phosgene
Carbonyl fluoride [353-50-4] 2 5,4 5 13
Catechol [120-80-9] 5 23 X
Cellosolve® acetate See 2-Ethoxyethyl acetate
Cellulose (paper fibres) [9004-34-6] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Ceramic (fibres) See Fibres-Refractory Fibres
Celsium hydroxide [21351-79-1] 2
Chlordane [57-74-9] 0,5 X
Chlorinated camphene [8001-35-2] 0,5 1 X C3
Chlorinated diphenyl oxide [55720-99-5] 0,5
Chlorine [7782-50-5] 1 3 3 9
Chlorine dioxide [10049-04-4] 0,1 0,28 0,3 0,83
Chlorine trifluoride [7790-91-2] P0,1 P0,38
2-Chloro-6-(trichloromethyl) pyridine See Nitrapyrin
Chloroacetaldehyde [107-20-0] P1 P3,2
Chloroacetone [78-95-5] P1 P3,8 X
a-Chloroacetophenone [532-27-4] 0,05 0,32
Chloroacetyl chloride [79-04-9] 0,05 0,23 0,15 0,69 X
Chlorobenzene [108-90-7] 75 345
o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile [2698-41-1] P0,05 P0,39 X
Chlorobromomethane [74-97-5] 200 1058
2-Chloro-1,3-butadiene See B-chloroprene
Chlorodifluoromethane [75-45-6] 1000 3540
Chlorodiphenyl (42 % chlorine) [53469-21-9] 1 X C2
Chlorodiphenyl (54 % chlorine) [11097-69-1] 0,5 X C2
1-Chloro2,3-epoxypropane See Epichlorohydrin
Chloroethane See Ethyl chloride
2-Chloroethanol See Ethylene chlorohydrin
bis (Chloroethyl) ether See Dichloroethyl ether
Chloroethylene See Vinyl chloride (monomer)
Chloroform [67-66-3] 5 24,4 C2
Chloromethane See Methyl chloride
Chloromethyl methy ether [107-30-2] C1
bis (Chloromethyl) ether [542-88-1] 0,001 0,0047 C1
p-Chloronitrobenzene See p-Nitrochlorobenzene
1-Chloro-1-nitropropane [600-25-9] 2 10
Chloropentafluoroethane [76-15-3] 1000 6320
Chloropicrin [76-06-2] 0,1 0,67
B-Chloroprene [126-99-8] 10 36 X
3-Chloropropene [107-05-1] 1 3 2 6
o-Chlorostyrene [2039-87-4] 50 283 75 425
o-Chlorotoluene [95-49-8] 50 259
Chlorpyrifos [2921-88-2] 0,2 X
Chromide ore processing (chromate)
(as Cr)
0,.05
C1
Chromium (metal) [7440-47-3] 0,5
Chromium (II) compounds (as Cr) 0,5
Chromium (III) compounds (as Cr) 0,5
Chromium (VI) compounds (as Cr)
Certain water insoluble
Water soluble
0,05
0,05
C1
Chromyl chloride [14977-61-8] 0,025 0,16
Chrysene [218-01-9] C2
Chrysotile See Asbestos
Clopidol [2971-90-6] 10
Coal dust
(less than 5 % crystalline silica)
[53570-85-7]
2
[respirable dust]
Coal dust
(more than 5 % crystalline silica)
0,1
[quartz respirable dust]
Coal tar pitch volatiles, as benzene solubles
[65996-93-2]
0,2
C1
Cobalt [7440-48-4], metal dust and
fume (as Co)
0,05
Cobalt hydrocarbonyl (as Co) [16842-03-8] 0,1
Cobalt tetracarbonyl (as Co) [10210-68-1] 0,1
Continious filament fibres
(fibrous glass)
See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Copper [7440-50-8] (as Cu)
Dust and mists
Fume
1
0,2
Corundum [1302-74-5] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Cotton dust, raw 0,5
Coyden® See Clopidol
Crag® See Sesone
Cresol (all isomers) [1319-77-3] 5 22 X
Cristobalite See Silica — Crystalline
Crocidolite See Asbestos
Crotonaldehyde [4170-30-3] 2 5,7
Crufomate® [299-86-5] 5
Cumene [98-82-8] 50 246 X
Cyanamide [420-04-2] 2
Cyanides (as CN) 5 X
Cyanogen [460-19-5] 10 21
Cyanogen chloride [506-77-4] P0,3 P0,75
Cyclohexane [110-82-7] 300 1030
Cyclohexanol [108-93-0] 50 206 X
Cyclohexanone [108-94-1] 25 100 X
Cyclohexene [110-83-8] 300 1010
Cyclohexylamine [108-91-8] 10 40
Cyclonite [121-82-4] 1,5 X
Cyclopentadiene [545-92-7] 75 203
Cyclopentane [287-92-3] 600 1720
Cyhexatin [13121-70-5] 5
2,4-D [94-75-7] 10 C2
DDT
(Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
[50-29-3]
1
C3
Decaborane [17702-41-9] 0,05 0,25 0,15 0,75 X
Demeton® [8065-48-3] 0,01 0,11 X
Di-sec-octyl phthalate [117-81-7] 5 10 C3
2,6-Di-tert-butyl-p-cresol [128-37-0] 10
Diacetone alcohol [123-42-2] 50 238
4-4'-Diaminodiphenylmethane See 4,4'-Methylene dianiline
1,2-Diaminoethane See Ethylenediamine
Diatomaceous earth See Silica — Amorphous
Diazinon® [333-41-5] 0,1 X
Diazomethane [333-88-3] 0,2 0,34
Diborane [19287-45-7] 0,1 0,11
Dibromodifluoromethane See Difluorodibromomethane
1,2-Dibromoethane [106-93-4] 20 155 X C2
Dibrom® See Naled
Dibutyl phosphate [107-66-4] 1 8,6 2 17
Dibutyl phthalate [84-74-2] 5
2-N-Dibutylaminoethanol [102-81-8] 2 14 X
3,3'-Dichloro
4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane
See Methylene bis (2-chloroaniline)
1,3-Dichloro-5,5-dimethyl hydantoin [118-52-5] 0,2 0,4
Dichloroacetylene [7572-29-4] P0,1 P0,39
o-Dichlorobenzene [95-50-1] P50 P301 X
p-Dichlorobenzene [106-46-7] 75 450 110 660 C3
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine [91-94-1] X C2
Dichlorodifluoromethane [75-71-8] 1000 4950
3,5-Dichloro-2,6-dimethyl-4 pyridinol See Clopidol
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane See DDT
1,1-Dichloroethane [75-34-3] 100 400
1,2-Dichloroethane [107-06-2] 1 4 2 8 C2
Dichloroethyl ether [111-44-4] 5 29 10 58 X
1,1-Dichloroethylene [75-35-4] 1 4
1,2-Dichloroethylene [540-59-0] 200 793
Dichlorofluoromethane [75-43-4] 10 42
Dichloromethane See Methylene chloride
1,1-Dichloro-1-nitroethane [594-72-9] 2 12
(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid See 2,4-D
1,2-Dichloropropane [78-87-5] 75 350 110 508
Dichloropropene (isomeres cis and trans)
[542-75-6]
1
4,5
X
C3
2,2-Dichloropropionic acid [75-99-0] 1 5,8
1,2 Dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane [76-14-2] 1000 6990
Dichlorvos [62-73-7] 0,1 0,9 X
Dicrotophos [141-66-2] 0,25 X
4,4'-Dicyclohexyl methane
diisocyanate See Methylene bis (4-
cyclohexylisocyanate)
Dicyclopentadiene [77-73-6] 5 27
Dicyclopentadienyl iron [102-54-5] 10
Dieldrin [60-57-1] 0,25 X
Diethanolamine [111-42-2] 3 13
Diethyl ether [60-29-7] 400 1210 500 1520
Diethyl ketone [96-22-0] 200 705
Diethyl phthalate [84-66-2] 5
Diethylamine [109-89-7] 10 30 25 75
2-Diethylaminoethanol [100-37-8] 10 48 X
Diethylene triamine [111-40-0] 1 4,2 X
Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate See Di-sec-octyl phthalate
Difluorodibromomethane [75-61-6] 100 858
Diglycidyl ether (DGE) [2238-07-5] 0,1 0,53
Dihydroxybenzene See Hydroquinone
Diisobutyl ketone [108-83-8] 25 145
1,6-Diisocyanatohexane See Hexamethylene diisocyanate
Diisopropyl ether [108-20-3] 250 1040 310 1300
Diisopropylamine [108-18-9] 5 21 X
Dimethoxymethane See Methylal
Dimethyl carbamoyl chloride [79-44-7] C2
Dimethyl sulfate [77-78-1] 0,1 0,52 X C2
2,6-Dimethyl-4-heptanone See Diisobutyl ketone
N,N-Dimethylacetamide [127-19-5] 10 36 X
Dimethylamine [124-40-3] 10 18
Dimethylaminobenzene See Xylidine
N,N-Dimethylaniline [126-69-7] 5 25 10 50 Xx
Dimethylbenzene See Xylene
N,N-Dimethylformamide [68-12-2] 10 30 X C2
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine [57-14-7] 0,5 1,2 X C2
Dimethylnitrosoamine See n-Nitrosodimethylamine
Dimethylphthalate [131-11-3] 5
Dinitolmide [148-01-6] 5
Dinitro-ortho-cresol [534-52-1] 0,2 X
3,5-Dimitro-ortho-toluamide See Dinitolmide
Dinitrobenzene (all isomers)
[528-29-0; 99-65-0; 100-25-4;
25154-54-4]

0,15

1

X
Dinitrotoluene [25321-14-6] 1,5 X
Dioxane [123-91-1] 25 90 X C3
Dioxathion [78-34-2] 0,2 X
Diphenyl See Biphenyl
Diphenyl ether See Phenyl ether
Diphenylamine [122-39-4] 10
4,4'-Diphenylmethane diisocyanate
(MDI) See Methylene bis (4-phenyl
isocyanate)
Diquat [231-36-7] 0,5
Disulfiram [97-77-8] 2
Disulfoton [298-04-4] 0,1
Disyston® See Disulfoton
Diuron [330-54-1] 10
Divinyl benzene [1321-74-0] 10 53
Dursban® See Chlorpyrifos
Dust, inert or nuisance particulates See Particulates Not Otherwise
Classified (PNOC)
Dyfonate® See Fonofos
Emery [12415-34-8] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Endosulfan [115-29-7] 0,1 X
Endrin [72-20-8] 0,1 X
Enflurane [13838-16-9] 75 566
Enzymes, proteolytic See Subtilisins
Epichlorohydrin [106-89-8] 2 7,6 X C2
EPN [2104-64-5] 0,5 X
2,3-Epoxy-1-propanol See Glycidol
1,2-Epoxypropane See Propylene oxide
Erionite See Fibres-Natural Mineral Fibres
Ethane [74-84-0] Simple asphyxiant
Ethanethiol See Ethyl mercaptan
Ethanol See Ethyl alcohol
Ethanolamine See 2-Aminoethanol
Ethion [563-12-2] 0,4 X
2-Ethoxyethanol (EGEE) [110-80-5] 5 18 X
2-Ethoxyethyl acetate (EGEEA) [111-15-9] 5 27 X
Ethyl acetate [114-78-6] 400 1400
Ethyl acrylate [140-88-5] 5 20 15 61 C3
Ethyl alcohol [64-17-5] 1000 1880
Ethyl amyl ketone [541-85-5] 25 131
Ethyl benzene [100-41-4] 100 434 125 543
Ethyl bromide [74-96-4] 200 891 250 1110
Ethyl butyl ketone [106-35-4] 50 234
Ethyl chloride [75-00-3] 1000 2640
Ethyl ether See Diethyl ether
Ethyl formate [109-94-4] 100 303
Ethyl mercaptan [75-08-1] 0,5 1,3
Ethyl silicate [78-10-4] 10 85
Ethylamine [75-04-7] 10 18
Ethylene [74-85-1] Simple asphyxiant
Ethylene bromide See Vinyl bromide
Ethylene chlorohydrin [107-07-3] P1 P3,3 X
Ethylene dibromide See 1,2-Dibromoethane
Ethylene dichloride See 1,2-Dichloroethane
Ethylene glycol (vapour and mist) [107-21-1] P50 P127
Ethylene glycol dinitrate [628-96-6] P0,2 P1,24 X
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether See 2-Ethoxyethanol
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether
acetate
See 2-Ethoxyethyl acetate
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether See 2-Methoxyethanol
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether
acetate
See 2-Methoxyethyl acetate
Ethylene imine [151-56-4] 0,5 0,88 X
Ethylene oxide [75-21-8] 1 1,8 C2
Ethylenediamine [107-15-3] 10 25
Ethylglycol acetate See 2-Ethoxyethyl acetate
Ethylidene chloride See 1,1-Dichloroethane
Ethylidene norbornene [16219-75-3] P5 P25
N-Ethylmorpholine [100-74-3] 5 24 X
Fenamiphos [22224-92-6] 0,1 X
Fensulfothion [115-90-2] 0,1
Fenthion [55-38-9] 0,2 X
Ferbam [14484-64-1] 10
Ferrovanadium (dust) [12604-58-9] 1 3
Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral
Fibres (note 4)
Fibrous glass, continuous filament
fibres
Fibrous glass, microfibres
Insulation wool fibres, Glass wool
Insulation wool fibres, Rock wool
Insulation wool fibres, Slag wool
Refractory fibres (ceramic or
others)

10
1 fibre/cm3
2 fibres/cm3
1 fibre/cm3
1 fibre/cm3

1fibre/cm3

[total dust, note 1]

C3
C2
C2

C3
Fibres-Natural Mineral Fibres (note 4)
Attapulgite
Erionite
Talc
Wollastonite
[12174-11-7]
[66733-21-9]

[13983-17-0]
1 fibre/cm3
Prohibited use
See Talc (fibrous)
1 fibre/cm3
C1
C1
Fibres-Organic Synthetic Fibres
Carbon and graphite fibres
10
5
[total dust, note 1]
(respirable dust, note 1]
Para-aramides fibres (Kevlar®,
Twaron®
Polylefines fibres
1 fibre/cm3
10

[total dust, note 1]
Fibrous glass dust See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Fluorides (as F) 2,5
Fluorine [7782-41-4] 0,1 0,2
Fluorotrichloromethane See Trichlorofluoromethane
Fonofos [944-22-9] 0,1 X
Formaldehyde [50-00-0] P2 P3 C2
Formamide [75-12-7] 10 18 X
Formic acid [64-18-6] 5 9,4 10 19
Formic aldehyde See Formaldehyde
Freon® 11 See Trichlorofluoromethane
Freon® 112 See 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane
Freon® 113 See 1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane
Freon® 114 See 1,2-Dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Freon® 115 See Chloropentafluoroethane
Freon® 12 See Dichlorodifluoromethane
Freon® 12B2 See Difluorodibromomethane
Freon® 21 See Dichlorofluoromethane
Freon® 22 See Chlorodifluoromethane
Furadan® See Carbofuran
Furfural [98-01-1] 2 7,9 X
Furfuryl alcohol [98-00-0] 10 40 15 60 X
Gasoline [8006-61-9] 300 890 500 1480 C3
Germanium tetrahydride [7782-65-2 0,2 0,63
Glass wool See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Glass, fibrous or dust See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Glutaraldehyde [111-30-8] P0,2 P0,82
Glycerin (mist) [56-81-5] 10
Glycidol [556-52-5] 25 76
Glycol monoethyl ether See 2-Ethoxy ethanol
Grain dust (oat, wheat, barley) 4 [total dust, note 1]
Graphite (fibres) See Fibres-Organic Synthetic Fibres
Graphite (natural) [7782-42-5] 2,5 [respirable dust, note 1]
Graphite (synthetic, except fibres) 10 [total dust, note 1]
Guthion® See Azinphosmethyl
Gypsum [13397-24-5] 10
5 [total dust, note 1]
[respirable dust, note 1]
Hafnium [7440-58-6] 0,5
Halothane [151-67-7] 50 404
Helium [7440-59-7] Simple asphyxiant
Heptachlor [76-44-8] 0,5 X
n-Heptane [142-82-5] 400 1640 500 2050
2-Heptanone See Methy n-amyl ketone
3-Heptanone See Ethy butyl ketone
Hexachlorobutadiene [87-68-3] 0,02 0,21 X C2
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene [77-47-4] 0,01 0,11
Hexachloroethane [67-72-1] 1 9,7 X
Hexachloronaphthalene [1335-87-1] 0,2 X
Hexafluoroacetone [684-16-2] 0,1 0,68 X
Hexamethyl phosphoramide [680-31-9] X C2
Hexamethylene diisocyanate [822-06-0] 0,005 0,034
n-Hexane [110-54-3] 50 176
Hexane (other isomers) 500 1760 1000 3500
2-Hexanone See Methyl n-butyl ketone
Hexone See Methyl isobutyl ketone
sec-Hexyl acetate [108-84-9] 50 295
Hexylene glycol [107-41-5] P25 P121
Hydrazine [302-01-2] 0,1 0,13 X C2
Hydrogen [1333-74-0] Simple asphyxiant
Hydrogen bromide [10035-10-6] P3 P9,9
Hydrogen chloride [7647-01-0] P5 P7,5
Hydrogen cyanide [74-90-8] P10 P11 X
Hydrogen fluoride (as F) [7664-39-3] P3 P2,6
Hydrogen peroxide [7722-84-1] 1 1,4
Hydrogen selenide (as Se) [7783-07-5] 0,05 0,16
Hydrogen sulfide [7783-06-4] 10 14 15 21
Hydrogenated terphenyls [61788-32-7] 0,5 4,9
Hydroquinone [123-31-9] 2
Hydroquinone monomethyl ether See 4-Methoxy phenol
4-Hydroxy-4methyl-2-pentanone See Diacetone alcohol
2-Hydroxypropyl acrylate [999-61-1] 0,5 2,8 X
2,2'-Iminodiethanol See Diethanolamine
Indene [95-13-6] 10 48
Indium [7440-74-6] and compounds
(as In)
0,1
Insulation wool fibres See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Iodine [7553-56-2] P0,1 P1,0
Iodoform [75-47-8] 0,6 10
Iodomethane See Methyl iodide
Iron dicyclopentadienyl See Dicyclopentadienyl iron
Iron pentacarbonyl (as Fe) [13463-40-6] 0,1 0,23 0,2 0,45
Iron salts, soluble (as Fe) 1,0
Iron trioxide, dust and fume (as Fe) [1309-37-1] 5
Isoamyl acetate [123-92-2] 100 532
Isoamyl alcohol [123-51-3] 100 361 125 452
Isobutyl acetate [110-19-0] 150 713
Isobutyl alcohol [78-83-1] 50 152
Isooctyl alcohol [26952-21-6] 50 266 X
Isophorone [78-59-1] P5 P28
Isophorone diisocyanate [4098-71-9] 0,005 0,045
Isopropoxyethanol [109-59-1] 25 106 X
Isopropyl acetate [108-21-4] 250 1040 310 1290
Isopropyl alcohol [67-63-0] 400 985 500 1230
Isopropyl ether See Diisopropyl ether
Isopropyl glycidyl ether (IGE) [4016-14-2] 50 238 75 356
Isopropylamine [75-31-0] 5 12 10 24
N-Isopropylaniline [768-52-5] 2 11 X
Isopropylbenzene See Cumene
Kaolin [1332-58-7] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Ketene [463-51-4] 0,5 0,86 1,5 2,6
L.P.G. (Liquified petroleum gas] [68476-85-7] 1000 1800
Lead [7439-92-1] and inorganic
compounds, dusts and fumes
(as Pb)

0,15
Lead arsenate (as Pb3(AsO4)2) [3687-31-8] 0,15
Lead chromate (as Cr) [7758-97-6] 0,012 C2
Lead tetraethyl (as Pb) [78-00-2] 0,05 X
Lead tetramethyl (as Pb) [75-74-1] 0,05 X
Limestone See Calcium carbonate
Lindane [58-89-9] 0,5 X
Lithium hydride [7580-67-8] 0,025
Magnesite [546-93-0] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Magnésium oxide fume (as Mg) [1309-48-4] 10
Malathion [121-75-5] 10 X
Maleic anhydride [108-31-6] 0,25 1,0
Manganese (as Mn)
Dust and compounds
Fume [7439-96-5]
5
1

3
Manganese cyclopentadienyl
tricarbonyl (as Mn)
[12079-65-1]
0,1
X
Manganese methy cyclopentadienyl
tricarbonyl (as Mn)
[12108-13-3]
0,2
X
Manganese tetroxide [1317-35-7] 1
Marble See Calcium carbonate
Mequinol See 4-Methoxyphenol
Mercury [7439-97-6], alkyl
compounds (as Hg)
0,01
0,03
X
Mercury [7439-97-6], all forms except
alkyl compounds (as Hg)
Aryl and inorganic compounds
Mercury vapor

0,1
0,05

X
X
Mesityl oxide [141-79-7] 10 40
Methacrylic acid [79-41-4] 20 70
Methane [74-82-8] Simple asphyxiant
Methanethiol See Methyl mercaptan
Methanol See Methyl alcohol
Methomyl [16752-77-5] 2,5
Methoxychlor [72-43-5] 10
2-Methoxyethanol (EGME) [109-86-4] 5 16 X
2-Methoxyethyl acetate (EGMEA) [110-49-6] 5 24 X
4-Methoxyphenol [150-76-5] 5
1-Methoxy-2-propanol See Propylene glycol momomethyl ether
Methyl acetate [79-20-9] 200 606 250 760
Methyl acetylene [74-99-7] 1000 1640
Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture
(MAPP)
[59355-75-8]
1000
1640
1250
2050
Methyl acrylate [96-33-3] 10 35 X
Methyl alcohol [67-56-1] 200 262 250 328 X
Methyl amyl alcohol [108-11-2] 25 104 40 166 X
Methyl n-amyl ketone [110-43-0] 50 233
Methyl bromide [74-83-9] 5 19 X
Methyl n-butyl ketone [591-78-6] 5 20 X
Methyl cellosolve® See 2-Methoxyethanol
Methyl cellosolve® acetate See 2-Methoxyethyl acetate
Methyl chloride [74-87-3] 50 103 100 207 X
Methyl chloroform [71-55-6] 350 1910 450 2460 X
Methyl 2-cyanoacrylate [137-05-3] 2 9,1 4 18
Methyl demeton [8022-00-2] 0,5 X
Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) [78-93-3] 50 150 100 300
Methyl ethyl ketone peroxide [1338-23-4] P0,2 P1,5
Methyl formate [107-31-3] 100 246 150 369
Methyl glycol See 2-Methoxyethanol
Methyl glycol acetate See 2-Methoxy ethyl acetate
Methyl hydrazine [60-34-4] P0,2 P0,38 X C2
Methyl iodide [74-88-4] 2 12 X C2
Methyl isoamyl ketone [110-12-3] 50 234
Methyl isobutyl carbinol See Methyl amyl alcohol
Methyl isobutyl ketone [108-10-1] 50 205 75 310
Methyl isocyanate [624-83-9] 0,02 0,047 X
Methyl isopropyl ketone [536-80-4] 200 705
Methyl mercaptan [74-93-1] 0,5 0,98
Methyl methacrylate (monomer) [80-62-6] 100 410
Methyl parathion [298-00-0] 0,2 X
Methyl propyl ketone [107-87-9] 150 530
Methyl silicate [681-84-5] 1 6
a-Methyl styrene [98-83-9] 50 242 100 484
Methylacrylonitrile [126-98-7] 1 2,7 x
Methylal [109-87-5] 1000 3110
Methylamine [74-89-5] 10 13
N-Methylaniline [100-61-8] 0,5 2,2 X
Methylcyclohexane [108-87-2] 400 1610
Methylcyclohexanol [25639-42-3] 50 234
o-Methylcyclohexanone [583-60-8] 50 229 75 344 X
Methylene chloride [75-09-2] 50 174 C2
4,4'-Methylene bis (2-chloroaniline)
(MOCA)
[101-14-4]
0,02
0,22
X
C2
Methylene bis (4-cyclohexylisocyanate) [5124-30-1] 0,005 0,054
4-4'-Methylene dianiline [101-77-9] 0,1 0,81 X C2
Methylene bis (4-phenyl isocyanate)
(MDI)
[101-68-8]
0,005
0,051
5-Methyl-3-heptanone See Ethyl amyl ketone
N-Methyl-2,4,6-Trinitrophenyl
nitramine
See Tetryl
Metribuzin [21087-64-9] 5
Mevinphos® See Phosdrin
Mica [12001-26-2] 3 [respirable dust, note 1]
Microfibres (fibrous glass) See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Mineral oil (moist) [8012-95-1] 5 10
Mineral wool fibres See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Molybdenum (as Mo)
Insoluble compounds
Soluble compounds [7439-98-7]
10
5
Monocrotophos [6923-22-4] 0,25 X
Morpholine [110-91-8] 20 71 X
Naled [300-76-5] 3 X
Naphtha See VM & P Naphtha
Naphthalene [91-20-3] 10 52 15 79
B-Naphthylamine [91-59-8] C1
a-Naphthylthiourea See ANTU
Nemacur® See Fenamiphos
Neon [7440-01-9] Simple asphyxiant
Nialate® See Ethion
Nickel
Metal
Insoluble compounds (as Ni)
Soluble compounds (as Ni) [7440-02-0] 1
1
0,1
Nickel carbonyl (as Ni) [13463-39-3] 0,001 0,007
Nickel sulfide roasting,
fume and dust (as Ni)
1
C1
Nicotine [54-11-5] 0,5 X
Nitrapyrin [1929-82-4] 10 20
Nitric acid [7697-37-2] 2 5,2 4 10
Nitric oxide See Nitrogen monoxide
p-Nitroaniline [100-01-6] 3 X
Nitrobenzene [98-95-3] 1 5 X
p-Nitrochlorobenzene [100-00-5] 0,1 0,64 X
4-Nitrodiphenyl [92-93-3] X C1
Nitroethane [79-24-3] 100 307
Nitrogen [7727-37-9] Simple asphyxiant
Nitrogen dioxide [10102-44-0] 3 5,6
Nitrogen monoxide [10102-43-9] 25 31
Nitrogen trifluoride [7783-54-2] 10 29
Nitroglycerin (NG) [55-63-0] P0,2 P1,86 X
Nitromethane [75-52-5] 100 250
1-Nitropropane [108-03-2] 25 91
2-Nitropropane [79-46-9] 10 36 C2
N-Nitrosodimethylamine [62-75-9] X C2
Nitrotoluene (all isomers) [88-72-2;
99-08-1; 99-99-0; 1321-12-6]
2
11
X
Nitrotrichloromethane See Chloropicrin

Nitrous oxide [10024-97-2] 50 90
Nonane [111-82-2] 200 1050
Nuisance particulates See Particulates Not Otherwise
Classified (PNOC)
Octachloronaphthale [2234-13-1] 0,1 0,3 X
Octane [111-65-9] 300 1400 375 1750
Oil mist, mineral See Mineral oil (mist)
Osmium tetroxide (as Os) [20816-12-0] 0,0002 0,0016 0,0006 0,0048
Oxalic acid [144-62-7] 1 2
Oxygen difluoride [7783-41-7] P0,05 P0,11
Ozone [10028-15-6] P0,1 P0,2
Para-aramides fibres See Fibres-Organic Synthetic Fibres
Paraffin was, fume [8002-74-2] 2
Paraquet, respirables particulates [4685-14-7] 0,1
Parathion [56-38-2] 0,1 X
Particulate polycyclic aromatic
hydrocarbons (PPAH)
See Coal tar pitch volatiles
Particulates Not Otherwise Classified
(PNOC)
10
[total dust, note 1]
Pentaborane [19624-22-7] 0,005 0,013 0,015 0,039
Pentachloronaphthalene [1321-64-8] 0,5 X
Pentachlorophenol [87-86-5] 0,5 X C2
Pentaerythritol [115-77-5] 10
n-Pentane [109-66-0] 120 350
2-Pentanone See Methyl propyl ketone
3-Pentanone See Diethyl ketone
Perchloroethylene [127-18-4] 50 339 200 1357 C3
Perchloromethyl mercaptan [594-42-3] 0,1 0,76
Perchloryl fluoride [7616-94-6] 3 13 6 25
Perfluorodimenthylcetone See Hexafluoroacetone
Perlite [83969-76-0] 10
5 [total dust, note 1]
[respirable dust, note 1]
Petroleum distillates See gasoline, Stoddard solvent, Naphtha VM & P
Phenacyl chloride See a-Chloroacetophenone
Phenol [108-95-2] 5 19 X
Phenothiazine [92-84-2] 5 X
Phenyl ether, vapour [101-84-8] 1 7 2 14
Phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) [122-60-1] 1 6,1 C3
Phenyl mercaptan [108-98-5] 0,5 2,3
p-Phenylenediamine [106-50-3] 0,1 X
Phenylethylene See Styrene (monomer)
Phenyhydrazine [100-63-0] 0,1 0,44 X C2
n-Phenyl-B-naphthylamine [135-88-6] C2
Phenylphosphine [638-21-1] P0,05 P0,23
Phorate [298-02-2] 0,05 0,2 X
Phosdrin [7786-34-7] 0,01 0,09 0,03 0,27 X
Phosgene [75-44-5] 0,1 0,40
Phosphine [7803-51-2] 0,3 0,42 1 1,4
Phosphoric acid [7664-38-2] 1 3
Phosphorus (yellow) [7723-14-0] 0,1
Phosphorus oxychloride [10025-87-3] 0,1 0,63
Phosphorus pentachloride [10026-13-8] 0,1 0,85
Phosphorus pentasulfide [1314-80-3] 1 3
Phosphorus trichloride [7719-12-2] 0,2 1,1 0,5 2,8
Phthalic anhydride [85-44-9] 1 6,1
m-Phthalodinitrile [626-17-5] 5
Picloram [1918-02-1] 10
Picric acid [88-89-1] 0,1 X
Pindone [83-26-1] 0,1
Piperazine dihydrochloride [142-64-3] 5
Plaster of Paris [26499-65-0] 10
5 [total dust, note 1]
[respirable dust, note 1]
Platinum
Metal
Soluble salts (as Pt) [7440-06-4]
1
0,002
Polychlorobiphenyls See Chlorodiphenyls
Polyolefines fibres See Fibres-Organic Synthetic Fibres
Polytetrafluoroethylene decomposition
products [9002-84-0] Determine quantitatively the decomposition
products in the air and express the results
as Fluorides (see Fluorides standards)
Portland cement [65997-15-1] 10
5 [total dust, note 1]
[respirable dust, note 1]
Potassium hydroxide [1310-58-3] P2
Precipitated silica See Silica — Amorphous, precipitated
Propane [74-98-6] 1000 1800
Propane sultone [1120-71-4] C2
Propanol See n-Propyl alcohol
Propargyl alcohol [107-19-7] 1 2,3 X
B-Propiolactone [57-57-8] 0,5 1,5 C2
Propionic acid [79-09-4] 10 30
Propoxur [114-26-1] 0,5
n-Propyl acetate [109-60-4] 200 835 250 1040
n-Propyl alcohol [71-23-8] 200 492 250 615 X
n-Propyl nitrate [627-13-4] 25 107 40 172
Propylene [115-07-1] Simple asphyxiant
Propylene dichloride See 1,2-Dichloropropane
Propylene glycol dinitrate [6423-43-4] 0,05 0,34 x
Propylene glycol monomethyl ether [107-98-2] 100 369 150 553
Propylene imine [75-55-8] 2 4,7 X C2
Propylene oxide [75-56-9] 20 48 C2
Propyne See Methyl acetylene
Propyne-Propadiene mixture See Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture (MAPP)
Pyrethrum [8003-34-7] 5
Pyridine [110-86-1] 5 16
Pyrocatechol See Catechol
Quartz See Silica — Crystalline, Quartz
Quinone See p-Benzoquinone
RDX See Cyclonite
Refractory fibres See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Resorcinol [108-46-3] 10 45 20 90
Rhodium
Metal and insoluble compounds
(as Rh)
Soluble compounds (as Rh) [7440-16-6]

0,1
0,001
Rock wool See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Ronnel [299-84-3] 10
Rosin core solder pyrolysis products
(as Formaldehyde)
0,1
Rotenone [83-79-4] 5
Rouge 10 [total dust, note 1]
Rubber solvent (Naphtha] [8030-30-6] 400 1570
Selenium [7782-49-2] and compounds
(as Se)
0,2
Selenium hexafluoride (as Se) [7783-79-1] 0,05 0,16
Sencor® See Metribuzin
N-Serve® See Nitrapyrin
Sesone [136-78-7] 10
Sevin® See Carbaryl
Silane See Silicon tetrahydride
Silica — Amorphous, Diatomaceous
earth (uncalcined)
[61790-53-2]
6
[total dust, note 1]
Silica — Amorphous, gel [63231-67-4] 6 [total dust, note 1]
Silica — Amorphous, precipitated [1343-98-2] 6 [total dust, note 1]
Silica — Crystalline, Cristobalite [14464-46-1] 0,05 [respirable dust]
Silica — Crystalline, fused [60676-86-0] 0,1 [respirable dust]
Silica — Crystalline, Quartz [14808-60-7] 0,1 [respirable dust], C2
Silica — Crystalline, Tridymite [15468-32-3] 0,05 [respirable dust]
Silica — Crystalline, Tripoli [1317-95-9] 0,1 [respirable dust]
Silicon [7440-21-3] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Silicon carbide (non fibrous) [409-21-2] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Silicon tetrahydride [7803-62-5] 5 6,6
Silver
Metal
Soluble compounds (as Ag) [7440-22-4]
0,1
0,01
Slag wool See Fibres-Artificial Vitreous Mineral Fibres
Soapstone [14378-12-2] 6
3 [total dust, note 1]
[respirable dust, note 1]
Sodium azide [26628-22-8] P0,11 P0,3
Sodium bisulfite [7631-90-5] 5
Sodium 2,4-dichlorophenoxyethyl
sulfate
See Sesone
Sodium fluoroacetate [62-74-8] 0,05 0,15 X
Sodium hydroxide [1310-73-2] P2
Sodium metabisulfite [7681-57-4] 5
Starch [9005-25-8] 10 [total dust, note 1]
Stibine (as Sb) [7803-52-3] 0,1 0,51
Stoddard solvent [8052-41-3] 100 525
Strychnine [57-24-9] 0,15
Styrene (monomer] [100-42-5] 50 213 100 426 X C3
Subtilisins [1395-21-7; 9014-01-1]
(Proteolytic enzymes as 100 % pure
cystalline enzyme)

P0,00006
Sucrose [57-50-1] 10
Sulfotep [3689-24-5] 0,2 X
Sulfur dioxide [7446-09-5] 2 5,2 5 13
Sulfur hexafluoride [2551-62-4] 1000 5970
Sulfur monochloride [10025-67-9] P1 P5,5
Sulfur pentafluoride [5714-22-7] P0,01 P0,1
Sulfur tetrafluoride [7783-60-0] P0,1 P0,44
Sulfuric acid [7664-93-9] 1 3
Sulfuryl fluoride [2699-79-8] 5 21 10 42
Sulprofos [35400-43-2] 1
Systox See Demeton®
2,4,5-T [93-76-5] 10 C2
Talc, fibrous (note 4) 1 fibre/cm3 C1
Talc, non fibrous [14807-96-6] 3 [respirable dust, note 1]
Tanalum [7440-25-7], metal
and oxide dusts (as Ta)
5
TEDP See Sulfotep
Tellurium [13494-80-9] and compouds
[as Te)
0,.1
Tellurium hexafluoride (as Te) [7783-80-4] 0,02 0,10
Temephos [3383-96-8] 10
TEPP [107-49-3] 0,004 0,047 X
Terphenyls [26140-60-3] P0,5 P4,7
1,1,2,2-Tetrabromoethane [79-27-6] 1 14
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane [76-11-9] 500 4170
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane [78-12-0] 500 4170
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane [79-34-5] 1 6,9 x
Tetrachloroethylene See Perchloroethylene
Tetrachloromethane See Carbon tetrachloride
Tetrachloronaphthalene [1335-88-2] 2
Tetraethyl lead See Lead, tetraethyl
Tetraethyl pyrophosphate See TEPP
Tetrahydrofuran [109-99-9] 100 300
Tetramethyl lead See Lead, tetramethyl
Tetramethyl succinonitrile [3333-52-6] 0,5 2,8 X
Tetranitromethane [509-14-8] 1 8
Tetrasodium pyrophosphate [7722-88-5] 5
Tetryl [479-45-8] 1,5
Thallium [7440-28-0], soluble
compounds (as T1)
0,1
X
Thimet® See Phorate
4,4'-Thiobis (6-tert-butyl-m-cresol) [96-69-5] 10
Thiodan® See Endosulfan
Thiodiphenylamine See Phenothiazine
Thioglycolic acid [68-11-1] 1 3,8 X
Thionyl chloride [7719-09-7] P1 P5
Thiram® [137-26-8] 5
Tin
Metal
Organic compounds (as Sn)
Oxide and inorganic compounds,
except SnH4 (as Sn) [7440-31-5]
2
0,1

2

X
Titanium dioxide [13463-67-7] 10 [total dust, note 1]
o-Tolidine [119-93-7] X C2
Toluene [108-88-3] 100 377 150 565
Toluene diisocyanate (TDI)
(isomers mixture)
[26471-62-5]
0,005
0,036
0,02
0,14
o-Toluidine [95-53-4] 2 8,8 X C2
m-Toluidine [108-44-1] 2 8,8 X
p-Toluidine [106-49-0] 2 8,8 X C2
Toxaphene See Chlorinated camphene
Tremolite See Asbestos
Tribromomethane See Bromoform
Tributyl phosphate [126-73-8] 0,2 0,22
Trichloroacetic acid [76-03-9] 1 6,7
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene [120-82-1] P5 P37
1,1,2-Trichloroethane (79-00-5] 10 55 X
1,1,1-Trichloroethane See Methyl chloroform
Trichloroethylene [79-01-6] 50 269 200 1070
Trichlorofluoromethane [75-69-4] P1000 P5620
Trichloromethane See Chloroform
Trichloronaphthalene [1321-65-9] 5 X
Trichloronitromethane See Chloropicrin
2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid See 2,4,5-T
1,2,3-Trichloropropane [96-18-4] 10 60 X
1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane [76-13-1] 1000 7670 1250 9590
Tri-o-cresyl phosphate [78-30-8] 0,1 X
Tricyclohexyltin hydroxide See Cyhexatin
Tridymite See Silica — Crystalline
Triethylamine [121-44-8] 10 41 15 62
Trifluorobromomethane See Bromotrifluoromethane
Trimellitic anhydride [552-30-7] 0,005 0,039
Trimethyl benzene [25551-13-7] 25 123
Trimethyl phosphite [121-45-9] 2 10
Trimethylamine [75-50-3] 10 24 15 36
2,4,6-Trinitrophenol See Picric acid
2,4,6-Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine See Tetryl
2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) [118-96-7] 0,5 X
Triphenyl amine [603-34-9] 5
Triphenyl phosphate [115-86-6] 3
Tripoli See Silica — Crystalline
Tungsten (as W)
Insoluble compounds
Soluble compounds [7440-33-7]
5
1
10
3
Turpentine [8006-64-2] 100 556
Uranium (natural)
Insoluble compounds (as U)
Soluble compounds (as U) [7440-61-1]
0,2
0,05
0,6
n-Valeraldehyde [110-62-3] 50 176
Vanadium pentoxide [1314-62-1],
fume and respirable dust (as V2O5)
0,05
Vegetable oil mists (except castor,
cashew and other similar irritant oils)
[68956-68--3]
10
Vinyl acetate [108-05-4] 10 35 20 70
Vinyl benzene See Styrene
Vinyl bromide [593-60-2] 5 22 C2
Vinyl chloride (monomer) [75-01-4) 1 2,5 5 13 C1
Vinyl cyanide See Acrylonitrile
Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide [106-87-6] 10 57 X C2
Vinyl toluene [25013-15-4] 50 242 100 483
Vinylidene chloride See 1,1-Dichloroethylene
VM&P Naphtha [8032-32-4] 300 1370
Warfarin [81-81-2] 0,1
Welding fumes
(not otherwise classified)
5
Wollastonite See Fibres-Natural Mineral Fibres
Wood dust (red cedar) 2,5 [total dust, note 1]
Wood dust hard and soft,
except red cedar
5
[total dust, note 1]
Xylene (o-,m-,p-isomers) [1330-20-7;
95-47-6; 108-38-3; 106-42-3]
100
434
150
651
m-Xylene-a, a’-diamine [1477-55-0] P0,1 X
Xylidine (mixed isomers) [1300-73-8] 0,5 2,5 X C2
Yttrium [7440-65-5], metal and
compounds (as Y)
1
Zinc chloride, fume [7646-85-7] 1
Zinc chromates (13530-65-9;
11103-86-9; 37300-23-5] (as Cr)
0,01
C1
Zinc stearate [557-05-1] 10
Zinc, oxide
Dust
Fume [1314-13-2]
10
5

10
[total dust, note 1]
Zirconium [7440-67-7] and compounds
(as Zr)
5
10
Zoalene® See Dinitolmide

PART IIDAILY EXPOSURE TO A SPECIFIC SUBSTANCE
OF A WORKER WORKING AT SEVERAL WORK
LOCATIONS
Where a worker carries out his work at more than one work location during an 8-hour period, each exposure at those locations must be included in the evaluation of the time-weighted average exposure value with respect to a substance listed in Part I of this Schedule.
For that purpose, the method of computation prescribed in the following formula is used:
Time-weighted average exposure value = (in mg/m3 or in ppm)
C1t1 + C2t2 + ... + Cntn
____________________
t1 + t 2 + ... + tn
Where:
C = measured concentration of a substance at a work location (expressed in mg/m3 or in ppm)
t = duration of exposure to the substance at the same work location (expressed in hours)
1, 2 ..., n = indication of work locations
t1 + t2 ... + tn = 8 hours
PART IIIDAILY EXPOSURE TO SEVERAL SUBSTANCES
Where 2 or more substances listed in Part I of this Schedule are present at a work location and where they have similar effects on the same organs of the human body, the effects of these substances are considered to be additive, unless it is established otherwise.
The concentration of the substances in the mixture is computed as follows:
C1 C2 Cn
Rm = ___ + ___ + ... + ___
T1 T2 Tn
Where:
Rm = sum of the fractions of the mixture
C = measured concentration of a substance at a work location (expressed in mg/m3 or in ppm)
T = permissible time-weighted average exposure value in accordance with Part I of this Schedule
1, 2, 3 ..., n = indication of substances in the mixture
If Rm is greater than one, the time-weighted average exposure value of the mixture of the substances is exceeded.
PART IVSUBSTANCES WHICH MAY NOT BE RECIRCULATED
Acrylonitrile or vinyl cyanide
4-Aminodiphenyl
Amitrole or 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole
Antimony trioxide (production)
Arsenic trioxide (production)
Benzene
Benzidine (production)
Benzo (a) pyrene
Beryllium (metal and compounds)
Bis (Chloromethyl) ether
Cadmium oxide (production)
Chloroform or trichloromethane
Chloromethyl methyl ether
Chromate (Chromite or processing)
Chromium VI (certain water insoluble compounds)
Chrysene
Coal tar pitch volatiles (as benzene solubles)
1,2-Dibromoethane
3,3′-Dichlorobenzidine
3,3′-Dichloro 4,4′ diaminodiphenylmethane or 4,4′-Methylene bis (2-chloroaniline)
Dimethyl carbomoyl chloride
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine
Dimethyl sulfate
Epichlorohydrin
Ethylene oxide
Hexachlorobutadiene
Hexamethyl phosphoramide
Hydrazine
Lead chromate
Methyl hydrazine
B-Naphthylamine
Nickel sulfide roasting
4-Nitrodiphenyl
2-Nitropropane
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
n-Phenyl-B-naphthylamine
Propane sultone
B-Propiolactone
o-Tolidine
Vinyl chloride (monomer) or Chloroethylene
Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide
Zinc chromates
PART VSUBSTANCES TO WHICH EXPOSURE MUST BE REDUCED TO A MINIMUM
C1 CARCINOGENS
4-Aminodiphenyl
Asbestos (actinolite, amosite, anthophyllite, chrysotile, crocidolite, tremolite)
Attapulgite
Benzene
Benzidine (production)
Bis (Chloromethyl) ether
Chloromethyl methyl ether
Chromate (chromite ore processing)
Chromium VI (certain water insoluble compounds)
Coal tar pitch volatiles (as benzene solubles)
B-Naphthylamine
Nickel sulfide roasting (fume and dust)
4-Nitrodiphenyl
Talc (fibrous)
Vinyl chloride (monomer)
Zinc chromates
C2 CARCINOGENS
Acrylamide
Acrylonitrile
Antimony trioxide (production)
Arsenic trioxide (production)
Benzo (a) pyrene
Beryllium (metal and compounds)
1,3-Butadiene
Cadmium dusts and salts
Cadmium oxide (fume)
Cadmium oxide (production)
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorodiphenyl (42% C1)
Chlorodiphenyl (54% C1)
Chloroform
Chrysene
2,4-D
4,4′-Diaminodiphenylmethane
1,2-Dibromoethane
3,3′-Dichlorobenzidine
3,3′-Dichloro4,4′-diaminodiphenylmethane
1,2-Dichloroethane
Dimethyl carbamoyl chloride
N,N-Dimethylformamide
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine
Dimethyl sulfate
Epichlorohydrin
Ethylene oxide
Formaldehyde
Hexachlorobutadiene
Hexamethyl phosphoramide
Hydrazine
Lead chromate
Methyl chloride
Methyl hydrazine
Methyl iodide
2-Nitropropane
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
Pentachlorophenol
n-Phenyl-B-naphthylamine
Phenylhydrazine
Propane sultone
B-Propiolactone
Propylene imine
Propylene oxide
Rock wool
Silica-crystalline, quartz
Slag wool
2,4,5-T
o-Tolidine
o-Toluidine
p-Toluidine
Vinyl bromide
Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide
Xylidine (mixed isomers)
ISOCYANATES
4,4′-Dicyclohexyl methane diisocyanate
4,4′-Diphenylmethane diisocyanate
Hexamethylene diisocyanate
Isocyanate oligomers
Isophorone diisocyanate
Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) (isomer mixture)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Sch. A; O.C. 1248-94, s. 10; Erratum, 1994 G.O. 2, 4125; Erratum, 1994 G.O. 2, 4255; O.C. 55-99, ss. 11 and 13.
SCHEDULE B
(s. 16)
MINIMUM RATE OF AIR CHANGE PER HOUR
Table I
AVERAGE GENERAL VENTILATION
_________________________________________________________________________________
| | |
| | Minimum rate |
| Classification of establishments | of fresh air |
| | change per hour
|
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Food and beverages |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Slaughtering and drysalting | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Mineral oils and fats factories | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Sausage and sausage casing manufacturing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Poultry processing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Milk concentrate manufacturing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Fish processing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Processing and canning of fruit and vegetables | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Biscuit manufacturing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Bakeries | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Confectioneries | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Vegetable oil mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Distilleries | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Breweries | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Wine manufacturing | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Tobacco products |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Leaf-tobacco processing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Tobacco products manufacturing | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Rubber |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Rubber footwear manufacturing | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Tire and tube manufacturing | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Other rubber industries | 3 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Leather |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Tanneries | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Shoe factories | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Textiles |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Cotton yarn and cloth mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Wool yarn mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Wool cloth mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Synthetic textile mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Fiber preparation mills | 5 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Thread mills | 5 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Cordage and twine industry | 5 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Carpet, mat and rug industry | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Textile dying and finishing | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Linoleum and coated fabrics industry | 4 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Garages |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Garages for maintenance and repairs | 4 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Garages for parking and storage | |
| | - with permanent employees | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | - without permanent employees | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Wood |
| |_____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Shingle mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Sawmills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Veneer and plywood mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Sash, door and other millwood plants | |
| | (excluding hardwood flooring) | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Coffin and casket industry | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Wood conversion industry | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Furniture and fixtures |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| |Household furniture industry | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Paper and related products |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Pulp and paper mills | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Manufacturing of asphalt roofing paper | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Paper box and bag manufacturing | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Metal products |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Metal fabricating industries | 4 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Miscellaneous machinery fabrication | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Electrical appliance manufacturing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Cell and battery manufacturing | 4 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Non-metallic products |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Cement industry | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Lime industry | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Gypsum products manufacturing | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Concrete products manufacturing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Reinforced concrete industry | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Clay products manufacturing (domestic clay) | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Refractory products manufacturing | 4 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Stone products manufacturing | 4 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Asbestos products manufacturing | 6 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Glass and glass products manufacturing | 4 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Abrasive industry | 4 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Chemicals |
| _____________________________________________________________________________|
| | | |
| | Explosives and ammunition manufacturing | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Mixed fertilizers manufacturing | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Plastics and synthetic resins industry | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Pharmaceutical and medical products | 2 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Paints and varnish industry | 4 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Maintenance products manufacturing | 3 |
| |___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | | |
| | Industrial chemicals manufacturing | 2 |
|___|___________________________________________________|_________________________|
| |
| Warehourses: See Table III of this Schedule |
|_________________________________________________________________________________|
| | |
| Any other class or establishment not appearing | |
| in this Table or in Table II of this Schedule | 1 |
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
The number of air changes per hour listed in this Table may be converted to cfm/ft2 by using the following formula:
Air changes/hour × 12 + height of work level in feet (ref. main floor)
_________________
60
or to m3/h/m2 by using the following formula:
m3/h
__________ = Air changes/hour × 3.6 + height of work level in metres (ref. main floor)
m2
Table II
RATE OF AIR CHANGE PER HOUR FOR CERTAIN CLASSES OF ESTABLISHMENTS
_________________________________________________________________________________
| | | |
| | Total ventilation area Fresh air | |
| |_____________________________________________|________________|
| Classification | | | | |
| of establishment |Unrefrigerated| Refrigerated |Refrigerated or| Relative |
| | spaces | spaces |unrefrigerated | pressure |
| | | | spaces | |
| | (litres/sec. | (litres/sec. | (litres/sec. | |
| | /pers.) | /pers.) | /pers.) | |
|__________________|______________|______________|_______________|________________|
| | | | | |
| Commercial | | | |negative |
| and industry | 9.4 |not applicable| 2.4 |pressure not |
| laundry | | | |exceeding 5 Pa |
|__________________|______________|______________|_______________|________________|
| | | | | |
| Office | 7.1 | 45 | 2.4 | not applicable |
|__________________|______________|______________|_______________|________________|
| | | | | |
| Laboratory* | 7.1 | 45 | 2.4 |negative |
| | | | |pressure not |
| | | | |exceeding 5 Pa |
|__________________|______________|______________|_______________|________________|
Where gases, fumes, vapours, mists or dusts are issued in an establishment listed in this Table, the minimun rates of air change per hour must be increased so that the standards prescribed in Schedule A are complied with.
* To compute the total ventilation area and the fresh air, the occupancy rate must be one person per 10 m2 for laundries and offices and one person per 5 m2 for laboratories.
Table III
VENTILATION IN WAREHOUSES WHERE INTERNAL COMBUSTION VEHICLES CIRCULATE
The ventilation rate per vehicle must be computed as follows:

_ _
|U P V |
Q = K |__ × __ × 2 _ ________ |
|50 45 4 250 m3 |
|_ _|
where
Q = air supply in m3/h prescribed per vehicle
K = ventilation constant, i.e. 8,500 m3/h per propane or diesel-powered vehicle, 13,500 m3/h per gas-powered vehicle
P = power of the engine in kilowatts
V = volume of space available in m3 per vehicle
U = percentage (%) of use of the vehicle during a work shift.
Notes:
(1) if the percentage of use of the vehicle (U) or the power of the engine (P) is less than 50% or 45 kW respectively, these factors must be omitted in the formula which must read as follows:

_ _
| V |
Q = K |2 _ ________ |
| 4,250 m3 |
|_ _|
(2) for the purposes of this Table, the volume of space available is equal to the total volume of the warehouse minus the volume occupied by the merchandise.
(3) if the volume available is over 4,250 m3, the formula does not apply and the minimum air supply is 8,500 m3/h per propane or diesel-powered vehicle and 13,500 m3/h per gas-powered vehicle.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Sch. B.
SCHEDULE C
(s. 30)
STANDARDS OF TEMPERATURE IN ESTABLISHMENTS

_________________________________________________________________________________
| | |
| Nature of work performed | Minimum temperature |
| | required
|
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | |
| light work performed while sitting: any mental | |
| work, precision work, reading or writing | 20 °C |
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | |
| light physical work performed while sitting: | |
| electric machine sewing and work with small | |
| machine tools | 19 °C |
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | |
| light work performed while standing: machine | |
| tool work | 17 °C |
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | |
| moderate work performed while standing: assembly | |
| and trimming | 16 °C |
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
| | |
| heavy work performed while standing: drilling and | |
| manual work with heavy tools | 12 °C |
|_______________________________________________________|_________________________|
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Sch. C.
SCHEDULE D
(ss. 37, 38, 39 and 40)
EVALUATION OF HEAT STRESS
Wet Bulb-Globe Temperature Index (WBGT) is computed by using the following equations:
(a) outdoors with solar load:
WBGT = 0.7 WB + 0.2 GT + 0.1 DB
(b) indoors or outdoors with no solar load:
WBGT = 0.7 WB + 0.3 GT
where: WB = natural wet-bulb temperature
DB = dry-bulb temperature
GT = globe thermometer temperature
To determine WBGT, the instruments required are a black globe thermometer, a natural (static) wet-bulb thermometer and a dry-bulb thermometer.
Heat exposures higher than those shown in Table I are permissible on the following conditions: the worker must be under medical supervision and it must be proven that his tolerance for working in heat is greater that that of the average worker.
Table I
PERMISSIBLE HEAT EXPOSURE LIMIT VALUES, IN °C (WBGT)
_________________________________________________________________________________
| | |
| | Work load |
| Alternate work/rest |___________________________________|
| regimen | | | |
| | light | moderate | heavy |
| | work | work | work |
|_____________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|
| | | | |
| Continuous work | 30.0 | 26.7 | 25.0 |
|_____________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|
| | | | |
| Work 75%, rest 25% (each hour) | 30.6 | 28.0 | 25.9 |
|_____________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|
| | | | |
| Work 50%, rest 50% (each hour) | 31.4 | 29.4 | 27.9 |
|_____________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|
| | | | |
| Work 25%, rest 75% (each hour) | 32.2 | 31.1 | 30.0 |
|_____________________________________________|___________|___________|___________|
Graph
PERMISSIBLE HEAT EXPOSURE LIMIT VALUES
Method of measurement
WBGT values are measured as follows:
(1) The range of the dry and the natural wet bulb thermometer must be between -50 °C and + 50 °C, with an accuracy of ± 0.5 °C. The dry bulb thermometer must be shielded from the sun and other radiant surfaces without restricting the airflow around the bulb. The wick of the natural wet bulb thermometer must be kept wet with distilled water for at least 30 minutes before the temperature reading is made. It is not enough to immerse an end of the wick into a reservoir of distilled water and wait until the wick becomes wet by capillarity; the wick must be wetted by direct application of water from a syringe one-half hour before each reading. The wick must extend over the bulb of the thermometer, covering the stem about one additional bulb length. The wick should always be clean and new wicks should be washed before being used.
(2) A globe thermometer, consisting of a 15-cm diameter hollow copper sphere painted on the outside with a matte black finish or equivalent, must be used. The bulb or sensor of the thermometer (range: -5 °C to + 100 °C with an accuracy of ± 0,5 °C) must be fixed in the centre of the sphere. The globe thermometer must be exposed at least 25 minutes before it is read.
(3) A stand must be used to suspend the 3 thermometers so that they do not restrict free air flow around the bulbs, and so that there is no obstacle between the heat sources and the wet bulb globe thermometer.
(4) Any other type of temperature sensor may be used that gives a reading identical to that of a mercury thermometer under the same conditions.
(5) The thermometers must be placed so that the readings are representative of the conditions in which the men work or rest, respectively.
Work load
The total heat load is the sum of the heat produced by the body and the environmental heat. Therefore, if the work is performed under hot environmental conditions, the workload category of each job must be established and the permissible heat exposure limit value pertinent to the work load evaluated against the applicable standard in order to protect the worker from exposure beyond the permissible limit.
The jobs performed by a worker must be classed in the following categories:
(a) light work: up to 200 kcal/h (sitting or standing to control machines, performing light hand or arm work, etc.);
(b) moderate work: from 200 to 350 kcal/h (walking about with moderate lifting and pushing, etc.);
(c) heavy work: form 350 to 500 kcal/h (pick and shovel work, etc.).
Table I thus gives the permissible heat exposure limit value for the specified work load.
An activity may be classed in a particular category by measuring the metabolism of the man at work or by estimating his metabolism using the following Table II:
Table II
ASSESSMENT OF WORK LOAD AVERAGE VALUES OF METABOLIC RATE DURING DIFFERENT ACTIVITIES
_________________________________________________________________________________
| | |
| A. Body position and movement | kcal/h |
|________________________________________________|________________________________|
| | |
| Sitting....................................... | 18 |
| | |
| Standing...................................... | 36 |
| | |
| Walking....................................... | 120-180 |
| | |
| Walking uphill................................ | Add 48 per metre rise |
|________________________________________________|________________________________|

_________________________________________________________________________________
| | | |
| | | |
| B. Type of work | average | Range |
| | (kcal/h)| (kcal/h) |
|______________________________________|_________|________________________________|
| | | |
| Handwork............................ |.........| 12-72 |
| light............................. | 24 | |
| heavy............................. | 54 | |
| | | |
| Work using one arm.................. |.........| 42-150 |
| light............................. | 60 | |
| heavy............................. | 108 | |
| | | |
| Work using both arms................ |.........| 60-210 |
| light............................ | 90 | |
| heavy............................ | 150 | |
| | | |
| Work using body..................... |.........| 150-900 |
| light............................ | 210 | |
| moderate......................... | 300 | |
| heavy............................ | 420 | |
| very heavy....................... | 540 | |
|______________________________________|_________|________________________________|
| | |
| Light handwork................................ |writing, knitting |
| Heavy handwork................................ |typing |
| Heavy work using one arm...................... |hammering in nails |
| |(shoemaker, upholsterer) |
| Light work using 2 arms....................... |filing metal, planning wood, |
| |raking a garden |
| Moderate work using 2 arms.................... |cleaning a floor, beating a |
| Heavy work using the body..................... |carpet railroad track laying, |
| |digging, barking trees |
|________________________________________________|________________________________|

_________________________________________________________________________________
| |
|C. Basal metabolism: 60 kcal/hre |
| |
| Basal metabolism: minimum quantity of calorific energy used when |
| the body is at complete rest |
|_________________________________________________________________________________|

_________________________________________________________________________________
| |
| Sample calculation: using a heavy hand tool on an assembly line | | |
|_________________________________________________________________________________|
| | |
| A. Walking along.............................. | 120 kcal/h |
| | |
| B. Intermediate value between heavy work | |
| using 2 arms and light work using | |
| the body................................... | 180 kcal/h |
| |________________________________|
| | |
| | 300 kcal/h |
| | |
| C. Basal metabolism........................... | 60 kcal/h |
| |________________________________|
| | |
| Total........................... | 360 kcal/h |
|________________________________________________|________________________________|
The tables in the following publications may also be utilized:
(a) Astrand P.O., and Rodahl K., Textbook of Work Physiology, New York, San Francisco, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1979;
(b) Amer. Id. Hyg. Assoc. J., Ergonomics Guide to Assessment of Metabolic and Cardiac Cost of Physical Work, No. 32;
(c) Energy Requirements for Physical Work, Research Progress Report No. 30, Purdue Farm Cardiac Project, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1961;
(d) Durnin, J.V.G.A., and Passmore, R., Energy, Work and Leisure, London, Heinemann Educational Books, 1967.
Alternate work/rest regimen
The permissible exposure limit values specified in Table 1 and the Graph are based on the assumption that the WBGT value of the resting place is the same or very close to that of the work location. The permissible exposure limit values for continuous work are applicable where there is 5-day work week and an 8-hour work day with a short break (approximately half an hour) for meals. Higher exposure limits are permitted if additional rest periods are allowed. All breaks, including pauses and administrative or operational waiting periods during work may be counted as rest time when additional rest periods must be given because of high environmental temperatures.
A worker whose job is self-paced will spontaneously limit his hourly work load to 30-35% of his maximum physical performance capacity, either by setting an appropriate work speed or by interspersing unscheduled breaks. Thus the daily average of the worker’s metabolic rate seldom exceeds 330 kcal/h. However, within an 8-hour work shift, there may be periods where the worker’s average metabolic rate will be higher.
Where the WBGT index of the work location is different from that of the rest area, a time-weighted average value should be used for both environmental heat and metabolic rate. When time-weighted average values are used, the curve to be referred to in the above graph is the solid line.
The time-rated average metabolic rate is determined by the following equation:
Maverage =(M1) × (t1) + (M2) × (t2) + ... (Mn) × tn)
_______________________________
(t1) + (t2) + ... (tn)
where M1, M2 and Mn are estimated metabolic rates for each of the worker’s work locations for the whole work period, and t1, t2 and tn are the time in minutes spent at each corresponding metabolic rate.
Similarly, the time-weighted average WBGT is determined by the equation:
WBGT average =
(WBGT1) × (t1) + (WBGT2) × (t2 + ... (WBGT) × (tn)
______________________________________________
(t1) + (t2 + ... (tn)
where WBGT1, WBGT2 and WBGTn are calculated values of WBGT for various jobs performed at rest areas and work locations occupied during total time periods, and t1, t2, tn are the times in minutes spent in the work locations and in each rest area.
Where exposure to hot environmental conditions is continuous for several hours or the entire work day, the time-weighted average must be computed as an hourly time-weighted average, i.e. t1 + t2 + tn + = 60 minutes. Where exposure is intermittent, the time-weighted averages must be computed as 2-hour time-weighted averages, i.e. t1 + t2 + tn = 120 minutes.
Scope of method
The WBGT method does not apply to unacclimatized workers who are physically incapable of performing a specific job or to workers who wear clothing especially adapted to certain dangerous tasks as protection against the heat.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Sch. D.
SCHEDULE E
(s. 41)
ILLUMINATION LEVELS IN ESTABLISHMENTS

__________________________________________________________________________________
| | | |
| Nature of work | Examples of corresponding task | Minimum illumination |
| | | level |
| | | Lux |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
| | | |
| Storage, reserve | Warehouses, stockrooms, supervision| 50 |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
| | | |
| General perception | Dormitories, grinding | 250 |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
| | | |
| Rough detail | Freight and passenger | |
| perception | elevators, escalators | 50 |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
| | | |
| | General lighting, lecture rooms, | |
| | moulding, manufacturing large parts| 250 |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
| | | |
| Average detail | Ironing, window dressing, packing, | |
| perception | labelling, heavy machine or bench | |
| | work, general office work | 400 |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
| | | |
| | Quick general inspection, studios, | |
| | study areas, typing, reading, | |
| | machine sewing, assembly of | |
| | average parts, special office work | 550 |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
| | | |
| Difficult detail | Repairs, difficult inspection, | |
| perception | lathe, hand sewing, embroidery | 800 |
|_____________________|____________________________________|_______________________|
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Sch. E.
SCHEDULE F
(s. 47)
METHOD OF MEASURING PREDOMINANT FREQUENCY BANDS (in corrected dBA)
(a) Using the analysis of each octave band from 31.5 Hz to 16 kHz, determine if one of the bands corresponds to the notion of predominant frequency band;
(b) add 5 dB to the measured level of each band corresponding to the notion of predominant frequency band;
(c) modify the resulting sound spectrum as follows:
— at the level of 31.5 Hz, deduct 39.4 dB
— at the level of 63 Hz, deduct 26.2 dB
— at the level of 125 Hz, deduct 16.1 dB
— at the level of 250 Hz, deduct 8.6 dB
— at the level of 500 Hz, deduct 3.2 dB
— at the level of 1,000 Hz, no modification
— at the level of 2,000 Hz, add 1.2 dB
— at the level of 4,000 Hz, add 1.0 dB
— at the level of 8,000 Hz, deduct 1.1 dB
— at the level of 16,000 Hz, deduct 6.6 dB;
(d) then add the levels of each octave of the spectrum thus modified by following the method for adding decibels;
(e) the result thus obtained is expressed in corrected dBA.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15, Sch. F.
REFERENCES
R.R.Q., 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 15 and 1984 G.O. 2, 3363
O.C. 576-82, 1982 G.O. 2, 962; Suppl. 1176
O.C. 1960-86, 1987 G.O. 2, 202
O.C. 55-90, 1990 G.O. 2, 339
O.C. 213-93, 1993 G.O. 2, 1757
O.C. 1248-94, 1994 G.O. 2, 3915, 4125 and 4255
O.C. 459-99, 1999 G.O. 2, 1115
O.C. 885-2001, 2001 G.O. 2, 3888