E-22, r. 1 - Regulation under the Act respecting explosives

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chapter E-22, r. 1
Regulation under the Act respecting explosives
EXPLOSIVES
Act respecting explosives
(chapter E-22, s. 22).
E-22
April 1 2016
The fees prescribed in the Regulation have been indexed pursuant to the notice published in Part 1 (French) of the Gazette officielle du Québec of 13 April 2019, page 309. (ss. 13.1, 13.2, 13.3). (Effect from 1 April 2019.)
DIVISION I
DEFINITIONS
1. In this Regulation, unless the context indicates a different meaning,
(a)  “magazine” means any building, construction, locker or box in which explosives are stored;
(b)  “explosive” means any object and any substance listed in Schedule 1; any mixture including one of those substances and any pyrotechnic item conceived to rise to a height of 300 ft and then explode;
(c)  “blasting agent” means any material or mixture, consisting of fuel and oxidizer, intended for blasting but not otherwise defined as an explosive; provided that the finished product, as mixed for use, cannot be detonated by means of a number 8 test blasting cap when unconfined: a number 8 blasting cap is one containing 2 gr of a mixture of 80% mercury fulminate and 20% potassium chlorate or a blasting cap of equivalent strength;
(d)  “low explosive” means an explosive which burns relatively slowly in the open air but which can be caused to deflagrate when confined: the term includes, but is not limited to sporting powder, black powder and rifle powder.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 1.
DIVISION II
PERMITS
2. The classes of permits are as follows:
(a)  general permit;
(b)  magazine permit;
(c)  sales permit;
(d)  transport permit.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 2.
3. A general permit entitles the holder to have explosives in his possession and is issued for a period of 5 years.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 3.
4. A magazine permit entitles the holder of a general permit to purchase and to store explosives.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 4.
5. A sales permit entitles the holder of a general permit to sell or otherwise alienate explosives to the holder of a magazine or sales permit.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 5.
6. A transport permit entitles the holder of a general permit to transport explosives.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 6.
7. The permits mentioned in sections 4, 5 and 6 are issued for a period corresponding to the duration of the operations for which they are requested. However, the period may not exceed 5 years.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 7; O.C. 944-83, s. 1.
8. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 8; O.C. 944-83, s. 2.
9. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 9; O.C. 944-83, s. 2.
10. (Revoked).
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 10; O.C. 944-83, s. 2.
11. Duplicates of a magazine, sales or transport permit are not valid unless issued by an inspector of explosives.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 11.
12. In case of emergency and notwithstanding sections 4 and 6, a magazine permit, a transport permit, or both at once, may be issued before a general permit is granted. However, the holder of such permit shall obtain his general permit within 8 days following the issuance of that permit.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 12.
13. Section 2 of the Act and Division II of this Regulation do not apply to sporting powder and rifle powder provided that the quantity does not exceed 10 pounds.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 13.
DIVISION II.1
FEES FOR THE ISSUE OR RENEWAL OF AN EXPLOSIVES PERMIT
O.C. 1282-94, s. 1.
13.1. The fee for the issue or renewal of a general permit is $42, non-refundable.
O.C. 1282-94, s. 1.
13.2. The fee for the issue of a magazine permit, a sales permit or a transport permit is $92, as a non-refundable set fee, plus $4, also non-refundable, for each month the permit is valid.
O.C. 1282-94, s. 1.
13.3. The fee for the replacement of a stolen or lost permit is $10.
O.C. 1282-94, s. 1.
13.4. The fees prescribed in sections 13.1, 13.2 and 13.3 shall be increased on 1 April of each year on the basis of the rate of increase in the general Consumer Price Index for Canada for the 12-month period ending on 31 December of the preceding year, as determined by Statistics Canada.
The fees thus indexed shall be reduced to the nearest dollar where they contain a fraction of a dollar less than $0.50; they shall be increased to the nearest dollar where they contain a fraction of a dollar equal to or greater than $0.50.
The Minister shall inform the public, through Part 1 of the Gazette officielle du Québec and, where he deems it appropriate, by any other means, of the results of the indexing calculated under this section.
O.C. 1282-94, s. 1.
DIVISION III
STORAGE OF EXPLOSIVES
14. The types of magazines are as follows:
(a)  Type I: for storing up to 300,000 pounds of explosives or 20 million detonators;
(b)  Type II: for storing up to 500 pounds of explosives or 7,500 detonators;
(c)  Type III: for storing up to 50 pounds of explosives or 100 detonators;
(d)  Type IV: for storing up to 50 pounds of sporting powder or for pyrotechnic items.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 14.
15. Type I magazines must be built to the standards indicated in Schedule 2 or 5.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 15.
16. Type II magazines must be built to the standards indicated in Schedule 3 or 5.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 16.
17. Type III magazines must be built to the standards indicated in Schedule 4 or 5.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 17.
18. Type IV magazines must be kept locked, and if the storing period of pyrotechnic items exceeds 7 days, they must be built to the standards indicated in Schedule 6.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 18.
19. Every Type I magazine must be protected by a fence built to the specifications described in Schedule 8.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 19.
20. Every Type I magazine must be equipped with a lighting system, consisting of at least 2 lights not fastened to the magazine, which illuminates the magazine and the yard around it up to a radius of 100 ft, unless the magazine is protected by an alarm system.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 20.
21. Every Type I magazine and a mine accessible by ramps must be supervised in any one of the following ways:
(a)  by hourly visits to the magazine at irregular intervals, recorded by a punch clock;
(b)  by closed-circuit television under constant scrutiny by a guard posted elsewhere on the premises;
(c)  by an alarm system as defined in Schedule 9, connected to a guardhouse situated on the premises, and continuously manned by guards having the means of communication and transportation needed to take quick action in case of theft;
(d)  by an alarm system connected to the nearest police station and continuously maintained in operation.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 21; O.C. 944-83, s. 3.
22. Every Type II and Type III magazine must be under the constant supervision of a guard or anchored if one takes advantage of section 24.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 22.
23. Type IV magazines built in accordance with the standards of Schedule 6 shall be visited at least once every 12 hours every day of the week, at irregular intervals.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 23.
24. Magazines constructed according to Schedule 5 are not subject to sections 19 to 22; however, when operations are interrupted for a period in excess of 12 hours, the magazines shall be visited at irregular intervals once every 6 hours.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 24.
25. Sections 15 to 23 do not apply to a person operating an underground mine when concerning explosives stored underground, insofar as a system of spot-checking is established and maintained in order to prevent any stealing of explosives from the mine; such checking must be recorded in a register giving the registration numbers and names of the miners involved and also the time and date of each spot-check.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 25.
26. This Division, with the exception of section 34, does not apply to a magazine which is part of a complex containing more than 7 magazines of Type I. Such complex as a whole must conform to the same standard of protection.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 26.
27. Igniter cords and safety fuses must be stored apart from other explosives in a locked container which need not meet the standards previously described.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 27.
28. The holder of a magazine permit must advise an inspector of explosives prior to any alteration made to the magazine.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 28.
29. Every permit holder must keep an up-to-date inventory of the explosives in his possession and a logbook indicating the place, time and date of their use, their quantity and description.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 29.
30. Cases containing explosives stored inside a magazine must be kept closed, stacked face-out and in neat rows to facilitate taking the inventory.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 30.
31. Every explosives magazine must be kept constantly locked, except when being serviced. Only the persons necessary to carry out such service are entitled to have access to the magazine.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 31.
32. It is forbidden to leave dry grass or other easily flammable substances or debris within a minimum radius of 50 ft of Types I and II magazines and of 25 ft of Types III and IV magazines.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 32.
33. A person wishing to make use of or store blasting agents only, including the “slurries” falling in that class of explosives, is not subject to the rules prescribed in sections 15 to 22. However, those explosives shall be kept locked and visited at irregular intervals once every 6 hours by a guard using a punch-clock, whenever mining operations where the magazine is located are interrupted.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 33.
34. The holder of a magazine permit must constantly supervise or have his explosives supervised by a holder of a general permit, where the magazine no longer meets the standards set forth in sections 15 to 21 and 25. In addition, when they have left the magazine, the explosives must be constantly supervised by the blaster or his helper for as long as the firing has not been done and the explosives have not been completely destroyed.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 34; O.C. 944-83, s. 4.
35. The use of explosives for educational or experimental purposes must be supervised by a professor of the subject under study or by a recognized specialist.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 35.
36. A magazine permit is valid only for a single magazine.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 36.
37. A magazine permit entitles the holder to store explosives only at the place specified on his permit.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 37.
38. Notwithstanding section 37, a magazine permit may be issued without there being specified therein a determined place, provided that the permit holder notifies prior thereto the Sûreté du Québec of any transfer and of the place where such magazine shall be situated.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 38.
DIVISION IV
SALE OF EXPLOSIVES
39. When explosives are sold, alienated or deposited for storage, every holder of a sales permit must make the following written entries in a register:
(a)  nature of the transaction;
(b)  name, address and permit number of the acquirer or of the depositor as the case may be;
(c)  quantity and description of the explosives which are the object of the transaction and the date of the transaction;
(d)  destination of the explosives concerning the sales or the alienation;
(e)  date of delivery of the explosives.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 39.
40. The holder of a sales permit with whom explosives are deposited under section 7 or 8 of the Act respecting explosives (chapter E-22), is required to accept them, except if they are in bad condition. Such holder may then either refund their market value to the depositor for the acquisition of the explosives or claim a reasonable remuneration for their deposit if he chooses to store them on behalf of the depositor.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 40.
41. Any holder of a sales permit who refuses to receive explosives because they are in bad condition must report forthwith the fact by the most rapid means to the nearest Sûreté du Québec detachment, giving the name, address and permit number of the person wishing to store the explosives as well as their quantity and description.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 41.
DIVISION V
TRANSPORTATION OF EXPLOSIVES
42. Explosives must be transported in accordance with the standards set out in Schedule 7.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 42.
43. The transportation of explosives within a single site or on private property shall not be subject to sections 42 and 48, but must be carried out in a locked container; otherwise the driver must be accompanied by a helper to watch the explosives.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 43.
44. The transportation of explosives by sea or by air shall not be subject to section 42, provided that the explosives so transported are kept locked up.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 44.
45. When detonators and other explosives are transported at the same time in a vehicle, they must be separated by a wall of solid wood of a minimum thickness of 6 in, extending to the roof of the body of the vehicle containing explosives, unless they are kept in individual boxes in accordance with the standards of Schedule 7.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 45.
46. The following provisions must be complied with in loading and unloading vehicles used to transport explosives:
(a)  whoever is employed to load or unload explosives in a vehicle or to drive a vehicle transporting explosives must take all necessary precautions to prevent unrequired persons from having access to such explosives;
(b)  once the work of loading or unloading a vehicle is started, it must be continued without interruption and finished as soon as possible.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 46.
47. Any person transporting explosives must deliver them without delay to a magazine for which a permit is held and the trip must be made without stopping.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 47.
48. The driver of a vehicle transporting explosives must have an invoice, delivery slip, bill of loading, shipping order or any other pertinent document in his possession; such document must give the name and address and the permit number of the consignor and of the consignee, the name and description of the explosives transported, the date of loading, the name of the driver of the vehicle and of any person authorized by the owner to accompany the driver.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 48.
49. Any permit holder transporting explosives purchased outside Québec must notify in advance an inspector of explosives giving him the following details:
(a)  name, address and permit number of the consignor and of the consignee or of the vendor and of the purchaser;
(b)  date, time and route of transport;
(c)  quantity and description of explosives transported.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 49.
50. When any vehicle transporting explosives is involved in an accident or any other incident causing a serious delay, the driver or his superior, if the driver is incapacitated, must:
(a)  report the fact immediately to the nearest detachment of the Sûreté du Québec;
(b)  report the fact to the owner of the vehicle who, if such explosives have not been damaged, must take the necessary measures for their immediate transportation to their intended destination or to a place suitable for storing them until it is possible to deliver them or, if such explosives have been damaged, take the necessary measures for their immediate transportation to a place designated by an inspector of explosives.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 50.
51. Igniter cords, safety fuses or sporting powder in quantities of less than 50 pounds must be transported inside a locked container which does not have to meet the standards set out in Schedule 7.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 51.
52. Any person transporting only pyrotechnic items must hold a permit but is not subject to sections 42, 46 and 47; however the load must be kept locked up.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 52.
53. Any person transporting explosives without stopping in Québec, from a point located outside Québec to another point also located outside Québec, is not subject to the requirements of sections 42, 46 and 47.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 53.
54. Any holder of a transport permit who is transporting only blasting agents, including “slurries” falling into that class of explosives, or only low explosives, is not subject to section 42 provided his load is kept locked up.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 54.
55. Any holder of a transport permit who is compelled to leave explosives in his vehicle when unattended must keep these explosives in a magazine or magazines built in accordance with Schedule 7 and solidly anchored to the vehicle; the latter must also have an anti-theft system which, in case of theft, sets off an alarm or locks the wheels of the vehicle.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 55.
56. While explosives are being transported, no person other than those holding a general permit shall be permitted on the vehicle.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 56.
57. The holder of a general permit shall notify, prior thereto, an inspector of explosives of any alteration to the truck or its body.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 57.
DIVISION VI
DESTRUCTION OF EXPLOSIVES
58. Any holder of a permit shall have the responsibility of destroying without delay any damaged explosives which he may have in his possession or under his control.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 58.
59. Such destruction of explosives must be carried out in front of a witness of full age and must be recorded in a register in which the place, time, date of destruction, quantity and description of the explosives must be entered and also the name, address and birthdate of the witness.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 59.
DIVISION VII
GENERAL PROVISIONS
60. No one may purchase or otherwise obtain explosives except from the holder of a sales permit issued under this Regulation, save the vendor acting under section 40.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 60.
61. This Regulation does not apply to:
(a)  the use of explosive substances in medicine in the form prescribed by the British Pharmacopoeia;
(b)  fuel or other hydrocarbons, fertilizers and explosive devices to operate certain tools, whenever the said products are used for their intended purposes;
(c)  ammunition in a finished and complete form;
(d)  explosives not corresponding to the definition of paragraph b of section 1.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 61.
62. Nothing in this Regulation relieves a person of his obligation to comply with the requirements of all applicable laws and regulations concerning the storing, transport, handling, utilisation and sale of explosives.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 62.
63. When a strike or lock-out is declared, every explosives magazine at that place or under the control of the employer must be kept under watch continuously by a guard or else emptied of its contents.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, s. 63.
SCHEDULE 1
(s. 1)
EXPLOSIVES LIST
—A—
A-3, composition A-3 (hexowax)
Acetyl benzoyl peroxide
Acetyl peroxide
Acetylides (refer to the specific metal acetylide)
Acetone di-peroxide
Aluminum containing polymeric propellant
Aluminum ophorite explosive
Amatol
Aminosulphonic organic salts mixtures
Ammonals (minols)
Ammonia dynamites
Ammonia gelatin dynamites
Ammonium bromate
Ammonium chlorate
Ammonium méta-periodate
Ammonium nitrate (AN)—amino compound explosives
Ammonium nitrate—nitroglycerine explosive mixtures
Ammonium nitrate—nitrolactose explosive mixtures
Ammonium perchlorate propulsive mixtures
Ammonium perchlorate explosive mixtures
Ammonium peroxychromate
Ammonium picrate (Explosive D)
Ammonium salt lattice with isomorphously substituted inorganic salts explosive mixtures
AN-FO, ammonium nitrate and fuel oil
—B—
B, composition B
Baratols or barium nitrate—tolite mixtures
Barium styphnate
Baronal or barium nitrate—tolite—aluminum mixtures
BEAF, 1, 2-bis (2, 2-difluoro-2-nitroacetoxyethane)
Benzite or trinitrobenzene
Benzoyl peroxyde
Bickford cord, safety fuse
Black powder
Blasting agents
Blasting caps
Blasting connectors
Blasting explosives
Blasting gelatin
Blasting powder
BTNEC, bis (trinitroethyl) carbonate
BTNEN, bis (trinitroethyl) nitramine
—C—
C, C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4 (plastic explosives containing cyclonite)
Carboxy—derivative propellant
CE or Tetryl
Cellulose hexanitrate explosive mixtures
Cheddites or chlorate explosives
Chloramines explosive mixtures
Chlorate of potash explosive mixtures
Chlorates with red phosphorus explosive mixture
Chlorates with sulphur explosive mixture
Chloratites
Chlorite of silver
Chlorite of lead
N—Chloro—o—toluenesulfonamide of sodium
Colloidal explosive powder
Composition A-3, (cyclonite and beeswax of hexowax)
Composition B (mixture of cyclotol)
Composition C-4 (plastic explosive containing cyclonite)
Connectors for blasting
Copper acetylide explosive mixture
Copper azide
Cordite
Cresylite (trinitrometacresol)
Crystalline explosive (cap sensitive)
Crystalling picrate with lead azide explosive mixture
Cyanuric triazide
Cyclomethylenetrichloramine
Cyclonite, hexogen or RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine)
Cyclotetramethylenetetrinitramine or octogen
Cyclotetramethylenetrinitramine or cyclonite
Cyclotol (cyclonite—TNT mixture)
—D—
D explosive or ammonium picrate
DATB (diaminotrinitrotetramethylenetetranitramine)
DATNB (diaminotrinitrobenzene)
DBX (TNT—cyclonite—NA mixture)
DDNP or dinol (diazodinitrophenol)
Deflagrating explosives
DEGN or dinitrodiglycol
Delay powders
Detonating cord
Detonators
Diazobenzene chromate
Diazoperchlorate of metanitrobenzene
Dibenzoyl peroxide
Diethyl gold bromide
Diethylene glycol dinitrate (GDN)
Diglyceryl tetranitrate
Dimethyl peroxide
Dimethylol dimethylmethane dinitrate composition
m—Dinitrobenzene
Dinitrodiglycol
Dinitroethylenediamine
Dinitroethylene urea
Dinitroglycerine
Dinitroglycol
Dinitrophenol
Dinitrophenyl hydrazine
Dinitrotoluene—sodium nitrate explosive mixtures
Dinol or 2-diazo-1-hydroxy-4, 6-dinitrobenzene, (diazodinitrophenol)
Dipicryl sulfone
Dipenta or dipentaerythritol hexanitrate, (DPEHN)
DNDP, dinitropentanonitrile
DNPA, 2, 2-dinitropropyl acrylate
DNT or dinitrotoluene
DPEHN, dipentaerythritol hexanitrate
Dynamites
Dynamites (permissible)
Dynamites (safety)
—E—
EDNA, haleite or EDNATOL, (ethylene dinitramine)
EDNP, ethyl-4, 4-dinitropentanoate
Erythritol tetranitrate explosives
Ethylene dinitramine
Ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN)
Ethyl—tetryl
Ethylene nitrate
Explosive conitrates
Explosive gelatins
Explosive plastics
Explosive mixtures containing oxygen releasing inorganic salts and hydrocarbons
Explosive mixtures containing oxygen releasing inorganic salts and water soluble or insoluble fuels
Explosive nitro compounds of aromatic hydrocarbons
Explosive organic nitrate mixtures
Explosive powders
—F—
FEFO, (bis-2, 2-dinitro-2-fluoroethyl)
Fireworks, refer to 1.01b
Fulminate of mercury
Fulminate of silver
Fulminating gold
—G—
GDN or ethylene glycol dinitrate
Gelatin dynamites
Gelatinized nitrocellulose
Gelignite (dynamite)
GEM, dinitro aliphatic explosive mixtures
Glyceryl nitrate
Glyceryl trinitrate
Glycol dinitrate
Guanylnitrosoaminoguanylidene hydrazine
Guanylnitrosoaminoguanyltetrazene or tetrazene; 1—(5 tétrazolyl)—4 guanyltetrazene hydrate
Guncotton
Gun powder
—H—
Haleite or EDNA
BBX-1 or cyclonite—TNT—Aluminum mixture
Heavy metal azides
Hexahydro-1, 3, 5—trinitro—s—triazine or hexogen
Hexamethylenetriperoxydiamine, HTT or HMTD
Hexanite
Hexanitrate of mannitol or MHN
Hexanitrocarbanilide
Hexanitrodipentaerythrite or DPEHN
Hexanitrodiphenyl
Hexanitrodiphenylamine or hexyl
Hexanitrodiphenylsulfone
Hexogen, cyclonite, (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine), C.A., hexahydrotrinitro—s—triazine or RDX
Hexogen or octogen and a nitrated n-methylaniline
Hexolites, (hexogen-tolite)
High explosives
HMTD, hexamethylenetriperoxydiamine or HTD
HMX, cyclo-1, 3, 5, 7-tetramethylene-2, 4, 6, 8-tétranitramine or octogen
Homocyclonite (octogen)
Hydrazine and dimethylhydrazine propellant
Hydrazine chlorate or perchlorate explosive mixtures
Hydrazine nitrate explosive system
Hydrazoic acid
Hyponitrous acid
—I—
Igniter cord
Initial detonating agents
Initiating explosives or initiating agents
Inorganic perchlorate explosive mixtures
—L—
Lead azide
Lead chlorite
Lead dinitroresorcinate
Lead hydrazide
Lead mannite
Lead mononitroresorcinate
Lead picrate
Lead sulfocyanate—potassium chlorate explosive
Lead styphnate (lead trinitroresorcinate)
Liquid nitrated polyol and trimethyloethane
Liquid oxygen explosives (LOX)
Liquid oxygen with wood pulp or other cellulosic compounds
Lithium perchlorate explosive mixtures
Low explosives
Lyddite or melinite (picric acid)
—M—
m-dinitrobenzene
Mannite
Mannitol hexanitrate or MHN
MDNP, (methyl 4, 4-dinitropentanoate)
Melinite, trinitrophenol, pertite, Shimose or picric acid
Mercuric azide
Mercurous azide
Mercury fulminate
Mercury hydrazide
Mercury nitride
Mercury oxalate explosive mixtures
Mercury oxycyanide (nitrated)
Mercury tartrate
n-Methyl-n, 2, 4, 6-tetranitroaniline (Tetryl)
Methyl picramide or trinitromethylaniline
Metriol trinitrate (TMETN)
Micro-connectors
Minol TNT-NA-aluminum mixture
Monobasic mercurous iodide
Mononitroresorcinate of lead
Mononitrotoluene—nitroglycerin mixture
Monopropellants
—N—
N-explosives or schneiderite
NA-H, ammonium nitrate and fuel oil or AN-FO
Nanceienne (pressed brown powder)
di-(1-Naphtyl) peroxide
NCN, nitrocarbonitrate
NH propellant
Nitramine
Nitrate sensitized with gelled nitroparaffin
Nitrates of polyalcohol and carbohydrate explosive mixtures
Nitrates of soda or of potash explosive mixtures
Nitrated carbohydrate explosive
Nitrated glucoside explosive
Nitrated mercurous oxycyanide
Nitrated mixture explosives, (ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate explosives or exchanged ions explosives)
Nitrated organic compound explosives
Nitrated polyhydric alcohol emulsion explosives
Nitrated polyol and trimethylolethane
Nitrated propylene glycol explosives
Nitric acid explosive mixtures
Nitric acid and carbocyclic fuel explosive mixtures
Nitric acid and nitro-aromatic compounds explosive mixtures
Nitric acid and nitrated-halogenated aromatic compound explosive mixtures
Nitro-aromatic explosive mixtures
Nitro compounds of furan explosive mixtures
Nitrocellulose or cellulose nitrate (guncotton) explosive (not inerted)
Nitrocellulose explosive mixtures
Nitro derivatives of urea explosive mixture
Nitrodextrin
Nitrogelatin explosive
Nitrogen resorcinate
Nitrogen sulfide
Nitrogen trichloride
Nitrogen tri-iodide
Nitroglycerin
Nitroglyceroglycol
Nitroglycide
Nitroglycol, glycol dinitrate, ethylene nitrate or GDN
Nitroguanidine explosives or picrite explosives
Nitromannite (MHN)
di- or tri-Nitronaphtalenes
Nitronium perchlorate propellant mixtures
Nitropentaerythrite (pentrit or PETN)
Nitropentaerythrite—nitroglycerin composition
n-Nitrophenyl diazonium perchlorate
Nitrosoguanidine
Nitrostarch (with less than 30% solvent or 20% water)
Nitrostarch dynamites
NP or PETN
Nitro-urea
—O—
Octal (75% HMX and 25% TNT)
Octogen, homocyclonite, cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine, octahydro-1, 3, 5, 7-tetrazocine or HMX
Octolites
Octowax
Ophorites, magnesium or aluminum—perchlorate explosive mixtures
Organic octonitrate explosive mixtures
Oxalate of mercury explosive mixtures
Oxalate of silver explosive mixtures
Oxygen (liquid) and carbon explosive mixtures
Oxygen (liquid) explosives (LOX)
Oxycyanide of mercury
—P—
Panclastites
Particulate explosives
Pellet powder
Pentaerythrite tetranitrate, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, pentrit, penthrite or PETN
Pentaglycerol trinitrate (TMETN)
Pentrit plastic
Penthrinite composition
Pentolite or PETN—TNT mixtures
Peracetic acid
Perchlorate mixture explosives
Perchloric acid based explosive mixtures
Permissible dynamites
Peroxychromate of ammonium
Peroxide based explosive mixtures
Peroxide, acetyl benzoyl
Peroxide of tricycloacetone
Pertite or picric acid
PETN (pentrit) plastics
Picramid or trinitraniline
Picramic acid, (2-amino-4, 6-dinitrophenol), or pricramates explosive mixtures
Picrate of ammonium (explosive D)
Picrate of potassium explosive mixtures
Picrate of lead
Picrate of zinc
Picratol (ammonium picrate—TNT mixture)
Picric acid or trinitrophenol
Picrite or nitroguanidine
Picryl chloride or trinitrochlorobenzene
Picryl fluoride
Plastic or hexogen plastic
Plastic explosives (see C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4)
Polyolpolynitrate—nitrocellulose explosives
Potassium chlorate and lead sulfocyanate explosive
Potassium chlorate base explosive mixtures
Potassium nitrate—sodium nitrate explosive mixture
Powder (explosive), granular, pelleted, extruded, mealed, in platelets, flakes, pearls, balls
Pressure venting blasting devices
Primers
Propellants (mono)
Propellant composition
Pyrenite or Tetryl
Pyrocellulose (cellulose nitrate)
Pyrotechnics (see Fireworks)
Pyrotechnic composition
—R—
RDX, (cyclo-1, 3, 5-trimethylene-2, 4, 6-trinitramine) or cyclonite
Resorcinate of lead
Roburites
—S—
Safety fuses
Salts of organic amino-sulphonic acid explosive mixture
Schneiderite or N explosive
Seismic gelatin
Seismic explosives
Selenium nitride
Semigelatin dynamites
Sevranites or substitution explosives
Shellite (melinite—dinitrophenol)
Shimose (melinite)
Silver acetylide
Silver chlorite
Silver fulminate
Silver oxalate explosive mixtures
Silver tartrate explosive mixtures
Slurried explosive mixtures of water, inorganic oxidizing salt, gelling agent, fuel and sensitizer
Slurry of explosive mixtures thickened with an inorganic oxidizing salt
Smokeless gunpowder
Sodatol
Sodium amatol
Sodium chlorate explosive mixtures
Sodium chlorate—sodium nitrate explosive mixtures
Sprenguite (pressed brown powder)
Squibs
Stannous nitrate (basic)
Starch nitrate (nitrostarch)
Streetites or cheddites
Styphnate of barium
Styphnate of lead (resorcinate of lead)
Styphnic or resorcinic acid
Sulfur bearing mixtures containing zinc, aluminum or magnesium with or without other oxidizing agent
—T—
T-4 or cyclonite
TACOT, tetranitro-2, 3, 5, 6-dibenzo-1, 3, 4, 6-tetraazapentalene
Tartrate of silver explosive mixtures
Tartrate of lead
TATNB or triaminotrinitrobenzene
TEGN or dinitrotriglycol
Tetranitrate of pentaerythritol, penthrite (pentrit), nitropentaerythrite, nitropenta, PETN or NP
Tetranitro-tetrazacyclooctane or octogen
2, 4, 6-Trinitraniline or pricramid
Tetraline, tetryl or tetralite
Tetranitraniline explosive mixture
Tetranitrodiglycerin
Tetranitromethane explosive mixtures
Tetranitride of sulfur
Tetrazene or tetracene
Tetryl, 2, 4, 6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine or tetranitromethylaniline
Tetralite, pyrenite or CE
Tetrytol or Tetryl—TNT mixture
TMETN or metriol trinitrate (trimethylolethane trinitrate)
TNA, tetranitroaniline or 2, 3, 4, 6-tetranitraniline
TNB, 1, 3, 5-trinitrobenzene
TNC or tetranitrocarbazole
TNEF, trinitroethylformal
TNEOC, trinitroethylorthocarbonate
TNECF, trinitroethylorthoformate
TNT, trinitrotoluene
Tolite or TNT
TORPEX or hexogen—tolite—aluminum mixture
1, 3, 5- Triazido-2, 4, 6- trinitrobenzene or trinitrotriazidobenzene
Trichloromethylperchlorate
Tridite (trinitrophenol and dinitrophenol)
Trilite or TNT
Trimethylenetrinitramine
Trimethylolethanetrinitrate—nitrocellulose mixture
Trimonite (melinite—mononitronaphtalene)
Trinitramine
Trinitraniline or picramid
Trimethylolethyl methane trinitrate composition
Trinitroanisol or methyl picrate
Trinitrobenzene
Trinitrobenzoic acid
Trinitrochlorabenzene or picryl chloride
Trinitrocresol
Trinitroglycerin or glycerol trinitrate
Trinitroglycerin mixtures
Trinitromesitylene
Trinitrometacresol
Trinitromethylaniline or methyl picramid
Trinitrometaxylene
Trinitromethane
Trinitronaphtalene
Trinitrophenetol or ethyl picrate
Trinitrophenol or picric acid (melinite)
Trinitrophenolate of lead
Trinitrophenylethylnitramine
2, 4, 6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine
Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine explosive mixtures
Trinitroresorcinol or styphnic acid
Trinitroresorcinate of lead or lead styphnate
Trinitrotoluence explosive mixtures
Trinitrotoluene explosive mixtures
Trinitrotriazidobenzene
1, 1, 1—trinitroxymethylethane or TMETN
Tritol, triton, trotyl or TNT
Tritonal or tolite—aluminum mixture
—U—
Urea nitrate
—W—
Water bearing explosives having salts of oxidizing acids and nitrogen bases, sulfates or sulfamates
Water-gel explosives
—X—
Xylene trinitrate, m-trinitroxylene
—Z—
Zinc picrate
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 1.
SCHEDULE 2
(s. 15)
CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS FOR TYPE I MAGAZINES
(1) General: These magazines shall be bullet-resistant, weather-resistant, fire-resistant and also resistant to forcible entry by thieves and attack by saboteurs, and be constructed as follows:
(2) Wood-frame walls:
(a) These walls shall be of the following type: an open framework, consisting of 2 by 6 in studs, continuous along their full height placed on 16 in centres and covered on both sides with plywood panels, as described in b and c, so as to form a space 6 in wide, to be filled with dust-free hard stone crushed to a diameter of less than 1/4 in or any other material which can significantly reduce penetration by bullets and which, in the case of an explosion, is not likely to constitute a hazard by being propelled any distance.
(b) The outer sheathing of the wall shall include, first, a layer of plywood of a minimum thickness of 1/2 in to which will be firmly stapled a 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh followed by another layer of plywood panel also of a minimum thickness of 1/2 in, the joints to alternate with those of the first. The metal mesh is not to be cut at the ventilation openings and is to cover them without a break; it is to be bent at least 16 in around each corner. The exterior wall shall be completely clad with 20 gauge galvanized iron, overlapping by at least 2 in at the joints and 4 in at the corners.
(c) The inner sheathing of the wall shall consist of at least one layer of plywood 3/4 in thick.
(d) The ventilators shall be either S-shaped, 4 in in diameter with the lower opening on the outside, or, straight-through, not larger than 6 in by 6 in protected on the outside by a steel plate 1/2 in thick, not more than 3 in from the wall and forming a hood. Inside they shall be equipped with a second 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh and, in addition, a screen to prevent objects from being inserted into the magazine.
(3) Floors:
(a) For permanent magazines:
i. a 4 in thick concrete slab, poured over 4 in of gravel, with an additional concrete topping 3/4 in thick;
ii. solid wood at least 4 in thick covered with plywood 3/4 in thick with the good side up. This type of floor shall be laid on a base of concrete, stones or concrete blocks. If columns or posts are used, leaving a crawl-space beneath the floor, 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh shall be placed between the 3/4 in thick plywood and the sub-flooring. In this case, a 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh shall close off access to the crawl-space.
(b) For mobile magazines: solid wood at least 4 in thick covered with the 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh, followed by 3/4 in thick plywood with the good side up.
(4) Roofs:
(a) roofs shall be well fitted and fastened to walls by means of anchor bolts;
(b) roofs may be built in any one of the following ways:
i. one layer of 2 in thick, tongued and grooved lumber, followed by 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh and then by a layer of plywood of 1/2 in minimum thickness, all to be covered with 24 gauge, or thicker, galvanized iron, or else, with asbestos roofing material in accordance with current practice so as to be adequately weather-resistant and fire-resistant;
ii. 2 layers of roofing plywood 3/4 in thick, sandwiching 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh, all covered as indicated in subparagraph i;
(c) whenever it is possible to shoot directly through a roof and hit the explosives stored, there shall be fixed to the ceiling a sort of wooden plate covered with polythene and filled with stone crushed to 1/4 in (or mortar containing 10% cement), at least 4 in thick.
(5) Door frames and sills: Door frames and sills shall consist of 2 angle-irons 4 in by 4 in and 1/4 in thick, continuously welded and firmly held to the frame by means of flat headed bolts. The doorstop shall consist of angle-iron one by one, by 1/4 in, welded along the whole frame.
(6) Door: The door shall be a hanging door consisting of 2 steel plates 1/4 in thick firmly riveted and welded along the edges, sandwiching a sheet of pressed asbestos at least 1/4 in thick and finally an inner facing of plywood 3/4 in thick affixed with contact cement. Such a door shall be solidly fixed on hinges such as CMT 5 x 5 for jails, or the equivalent, so that once it is closed, there remains not more than 1/16 in clearance between the door and the frames or the sills. In addition, the inner face of such a door, on the side of the hinges, shall be fitted with not less than 3 fixed locking bolts consisting of 3 lugs of at least a 3/4 in2 section, welded on the edge of each door at regular intervals and protruding enough the block the latter, once it is closed, by fitting into recesses in the framework.
(7) Locking devices: The hanging door shall be equipped with 2 maximum security, independent, anti-theft, mortise locks with individual keys which cannot be duplicated except by the manufacturer, only after identification and signature, or alternatively with any other approved locking system guaranteed to give equal or better security.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 2.
N.B. Already-existing concrete block structures shall be protected either by a steel cladding at least 1/8 in thick, and all seams continuously welded or by a 1/2 in, 16 gauge or thicker, expanded steel mesh on the entire surface of the walls, covered by 3 layers of stucco each not less than 1/4 in thick.
SCHEDULE 3
(s. 16)
CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS FOR TYPE II MAGAZINES
1. These magazines may be built in accordance with one of the following 2 options:
(a) 1st option: A metal box or case with each side solidly constructed and with cover or pivoting front panel, all fabricated of welded steel plates 1/4 in thick. Such cover or panel shall have an insulated lining and shall overlap the edge of the box by at least 1 in along its whole perimeter. Such cover or panel shall have hinges and a closing system identical to those described in section 6 of Schedule 2. The inside shall be lined with a nonsparking material.
(b) 2nd option: A box or case with each side solidly constructed and with a cover or pivoting front panel made of 2 layers of plywood 3/4 in thick sandwiching 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh extending around the corners, all to be covered on the outside with a tight cladding of galvanized iron of a thickness not less than 20 gauge and overlapping at least 4 in at the corners and 2 in at the joints. The first inner layer of plywood may be replaced by tongued and grooved boards 2 in thick. The cover shall be made in an identical manner to the sides and shall have strong hinges fastened inside and riveted. The box or case shall be equipped with 2 maximum security, independent, anti-theft, mortise locks with individual keys which cannot be duplicated except by the manufacturer, only after identification and signature, or alternatively, with any other locking system guaranteed to give equal security.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 3.
SCHEDULE 4
(s. 17)
CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS FOR TYPE III MAGAZINES
(1) Such magazines shall consist of a welded steel case or strong-box at least 1/4 in thick equipped with one maximum security, independent, anti-theft, mortise lock with individual key which cannot be duplicated except by the manufacturer, only after identification and signature, or alternatively with any other locking system guaranteed to give equal security. The interior walls shall be lined with a nonsparking material.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 4.
SCHEDULE 5
(ss. 15, 16, 17 and 24)
ALTERNATIVE CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS FOR ALL-WELDED STEEL TYPE I MAGAZINES
(1) Such magazines shall be all-welded steel containers; their construction shall be relatively light weight and the walls as well as the floor shall be fabricated of all-welded steel plates at least 1/4 in thick; the roof shall be of a minimum thickness of 3/16 in. The plates in question shall be firmly fastened to a strong but light steel framework. The interior walls, as well as the ceiling and floor shall be covered with one layer of plywood 3/4 in thick in such a way as to leave a space at least 3 in wide between the outer and inner walls. This space shall be well filled with hard stone crushed to 1/4 in size and washed to get rid of fine particles.
(2) The walls, roof and floor, may also be built of any other combination of steel for the outer surface and of wood or other nonsparking material for the inner one, with or without a space in between, but proven to have theft and bullet resistance equivalent to the fabricated metal assembly described in section 1.
(3) The frame and sill of the door shall be made of 3 in channel iron, at least 1/4 in thick, continuously welded, and equipped with a door stop consisting of an angle-iron 1 in by 1 in, by 1/4 in, welded around all the perimeter.
(4) The door shall be a hanging door consisting first of 2 steel plates 1/4 in thick firmly riveted, welded along the edges and sandwiching a sheet of pressed asbestos at least 3/4 in thick, second, an inner sheathing of plywood 1/4 in thick affixed with contact cement. Such door shall be solidly fixed on hinges such as CMT 5 x 5 for jails, or the equivalent, so that once it is closed, there remains not more than 1/16 in clearance between the door and the frame or the sill. In addition, the inner face of such door, on the side of the hinges, shall be fitted with not less than 3 fixed locking bolts consisting of 3 lugs of at least a 3/4 in2 section, welded on the edge of each door at regular intervals and protruding enough to block the latter, once it is closed, by fitting into recesses in the framework.
(5) The hanging door shall be equipped with 2 maximum security, independent, anti-theft, mortise locks with individual keys which cannot be duplicated except by the manufacturer, only after identification and signature, or alternatively with any other locking system guaranteed to give equal or better security.
(6) The ventilators, if present, shall be of the straight-through type, not larger than 6 in by 6 in, protected on the outside by a steel plate 1/2 in thick, twice the size of the orifice, not more than 3 in from the wall and forming a hood: they shall be equipped with a second 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh and, in addition, with a screen to prevent any object from being inserted into the magazine.
(7) Any other modality in the form of ventilation must afford the same degree of security against theft or insertion of any object into the magazine.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 5.
SCHEDULE 6
(ss. 18 and 23)
STANDARDS OF CONSTRUCTION OF TYPE IV MAGAZINES
(1) The structure of such magazines shall include a 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh, sandwiched between 2 layers of plywood respectively 1/2 in thick and 1/4 in thick, the latter facing the interior of the warehouse or magazine.
(2) Any opening other than doors shall be protected with a strong wire mesh.
(3) The doors shall be reinforced on the exterior side by a wood sheathing 1/2 in thick sandwiching a 5/16 in, 18 gauge, expanded steel mesh, all to be covered with 20 gauge galvanized iron: they must be hung on hinges such as CMT 5 x 5 for jails and the locking devices shall be identical to that described in Schedule 2 except that only 1 lock per door is required.
(4) Any applicant having more than 7 magazines of Type IV may modify them at a rate of 2 per year. However, all the magazines should in the meantime conform to the requirements of sections 2 and 3.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 6.
SCHEDULE 7
(ss. 42, 45 and 55)
(A) STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORT BY ROAD VEHICLE
(a) The transport by road of a net quantity of explosives not exceeding 20,000 kg shall be carried out in a vehicle having an enclosed body made of welded or riveted sheet metal not less than 1.14 mm (45/1,000 in) thick, solidly anchored to the chassis of the vehicle and covered on the inside of its walls and roof with a layer of plywood not less than 0.63 cm thick. The floor shall be built of oak planks not less than 3.18 cm thick or of wood of equivalent strength. The vehicle and the body must be kept in good condition and working order. Each door of the part of the vehicle containing the explosives must be secured by a padlock of superior quality or by an equivalent type of locking device.
(b) A holder of a transport permit who wishes to avail himself of section 55 shall fulfil the following conditions:
(a) transport not more than 25 kg of explosives;
(b) transport not more than 250 detonators;
(c) transport the explosives and detonators in 2 adjoining boxes built as follows:
Such boxes shall be made of completely welded 0.63 cm steel plates on all their surfaces with a separate hinged cover or hinged front panel. The covers or panels shall have gaskets, and each one shall have a lock combined with an anti-theft system approved by the Minister of the same type as that described in section 7 of Schedule 2. The inside shall be covered with plywood not less than 1.27 cm thick. The partition separating the 2 boxes shall be filled with not less than 7.62 cm of 0.63 cm crushed stone and shall be covered on each side by a steel plate 0.63 cm thick and plywood 1.27 cm thick. The vehicle, the boxes and the anti-theft system shall be kept in good condition and working order.
(B) STANDARDS FOR THE TRANSPORT OF EXPLOSIVES BY RAILROAD
1. All explosives transported by railroad must be in a car locked by a “Bull Ring” or any other device of the same efficiency.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 7; O.C. 1553-91, s. 1.
SCHEDULE 8
(s. 19)
FENCING OF EXPLOSIVES MAGAZINES
(1) Fences shall be of the industrial type, with a maximum mesh opening of 2 in, be of 9 gauge wire, or heavier, be 8 ft in height and be topped by 3 strands or barbed wire angled at 45º.
(2) Each must completely surround a magazine at a distance of at least 15 ft and have a padlocked gate, to be opened only when servicing the magazine.
(3) The bottom of the fence must be within 3 in of the surface of hard ground or must be set 1 ft deep into soft earth.
(4) In the case of a complex described in section 26, a single fence surrounding the whole complex is sufficient. Generally, a special fence is not required when the magazine is on the grounds of an establishment surrounded by a fence at least as protective as the prescribed fence.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 8.
SCHEDULE 9
(s. 21)
ALARM SYSTEM FOR EXPLOSIVES MAGAZINES
(1) The alarm system shall be effective, operate independently during electrical failures, in no way endanger stored explosives, be able to operate under all weather conditions and shall not develop by induction, radio-electricity or otherwise a current of more than 0.06 amperes.
(2) In the case of a complex as described in section 26, an alarm protection system may be global or individual.
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Sch. 9.
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Form 1; O.C. 944-83, s. 5.
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Form 2; O.C. 944-83, s. 5.
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Form 3; O.C. 944-83, s. 5.
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Form 4; O.C. 944-83, s. 5.
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Form 5; O.C. 944-83, s. 5.
(Revoked)
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1, Form 6; O.C. 944-83, s. 5.
REFERENCES
R.R.Q., 1981, c. E-22, r. 1
O.C. 944-83, 1983 G.O. 2, 1975
O.C. 1553-91, 1991 G.O. 2, 4580
O.C. 1282-94, 1994 G.O. 2, 3840