S-2.1, r. 5 - Regulation respecting health and safety committees

Full text
chapter S-2.1, r. 5
Regulation respecting health and safety committees
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY — HEALTH AND SAFETY COMMITTEES
Act respecting occupational health and safety
(chapter S-2.1, s. 223)
S-2.1
September 1 2012
DIVISION I
SCOPE
1. In Divisions II and V, “committee” means an occupational health and safety committee established pursuant to section 68, 69 or 82 of the Act respecting occupational health and safety (chapter S-2.1).
O.C. 2025-83, s. 1.
2. In Divisions III, IV and VI, “committee” means a health and safety committee established pursuant to section 68 or 69 of the Act.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 2.
DIVISION II
CATEGORIES OF ESTABLISHMENTS
3. The categories of establishments in which a committee may be established are described in Schedule 1.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 3.
DIVISION III
COMPOSITION OF A COMMITTEE
4. The number of members who represent the workers on a committee is determined through an agreement between the employer and the certified association or associations that represent some of the workers of the establishment or, in the absence thereof, all the workers of the establishment. The number must include members who represent the workers and those who are safety representatives on the committee.
Where the parties fail to agree as to the total number of members who represent the workers on a committee, the number is as follows:
(1)  2, where the establishment in which the committee was established employs 50 workers or less, except where the establishment includes a group of workers not represented by a certified association that has appointed a committee member in accordance with section 13, in which case the number is brought from 2 to 3;
(2)  3, where the establishment in which the committee was established employs from 51 to 150 workers;
(3)  5, where the establishment in which the committee was established employs from 151 to 500 workers;
(4)  7, where the establishment in which the committee was established employs from 501 to 1,000 workers;
(5)  9, where the establishment in which the committee was established employs from 1,001 to 1,500 workers;
(6)  11, where the establishment in which the committee was established employs more than 1,500 workers.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 4.
5. The minimum number of members who represent the employer on a committee is 1.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 5.
6. The maximum number of members who represent the workers on a committee is 11.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 6.
7. The employer may appoint as many members on a committee as the number of members who represent the workers on the committee.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 7.
8. The committee shall revise the number of its members annually, one year after the notice referred to in section 69 of the Act is sent, or whenever the number of workers employed by the establishment varies by more than 20%.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 8.
9. A committee is not dissolved where the establishment in which it was established employs 20 workers or less.
However, such a committee may be dissolved upon the sending of a notice to the Commission des normes, de l’équité, de la santé et de la sécurité du travail by the employer, a certified association or, in the absence thereof, at least 4 workers, where the establishment in which the committee was established has employed 20 workers or less for more than 12 consecutive months.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 9.
DIVISION IV
TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF APPOINTMENT
10. Where several certified associations representing all the workers of an establishment fail to agree on the appointment of workers on a committee, the workers are appointed in accordance with the following terms and conditions:
(1)  the certified association that, where applicable, represents the absolute majority of the workers shall appoint the absolute majority of the workers’ representatives on the committee;
(2)  (a)  subject to the provisions in subparagraph b, the certified associations not referred to in paragraph 1 shall appoint, where applicable, their representatives on the committee in accordance with the following procedures:
i.  the certified association that represents the highest percentage of workers of an establishment appoints a representative;
ii.  the percentage of the certified association that made the last appointment is reduced by half;
iii.  the certified association that then represents the highest percentage of workers appoints another representative;
iv.  the procedure outlined in ii and iii is repeated until no more appointments remain.
A certified association may join together with one or several other certified associations for the purposes of applying this subparagraph. The overall percentage of workers represented by the joining together in the establishment is thus taken into consideration.
Where 2 or several certified associations or groups of associations have an equal number of representatives, the representative is appointed by a draw, with each association or group of associations presenting the name of one candidate for the draw. The representative is deemed appointed by the association or group of associations whose candidate’s name is drawn.
(b)  if, as a result of applying the terms and conditions of appointment described in subparagraph a, a certified association or group of certified associations could not appoint a representative on the committee, and despite subparagraph a, the last representative to be appointed is appointed by a draw between the certified associations or groups of certified associations that have not appointed a representative on the committee.
A certified association authorized to appoint a workers’ representative on the committee that fails to do so within 30 days after a failure to reach an agreement is noted is deemed to have refused or neglected to appoint its representative on the committee.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 10.
11. Where one certified association only represents some, but not all, of the workers of an establishment, that association shall appoint the majority of the workers’ representatives on a committee. The other workers’ representatives on the committee are appointed by the group of workers not represented by the certified association.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 11.
12. Where several certified associations represent some, but not all, of the workers of an establishment, the workers’ representatives on a committee are appointed in accordance with section 10.
Workers not represented by a certified association are thus deemed to form a participating group to which the provisions in subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph of section 10 apply, with the necessary modifications. However, that group may not appoint more workers’ representatives on the committee than all the certified associations.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 12.
13. Where, as a result of applying the terms and conditions of appointment in sections 11 and 12, the group of workers not represented by a certified association is authorized to appoint a representative on a committee, the latter is appointed through a vote taken at a meeting convened for that purpose by the workers’ and employer’s representatives who are already committee members.
Notice of the vote and of the meeting for nominations must be posted up in the establishment at least 5 days before the activities take place, so that all workers concerned may take part.
The candidate among the workers who obtains the most votes is appointed representative.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 13.
14. Where, in an establishment, the group of workers not represented by a certified association or a certified association refuses or neglects to appoint its representative on a committee, the position left vacant is filled in accordance with section 10, 11 or 12, as long as the appointment has not been made.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 14.
15. Where the workers of an establishment are not represented by a certified association, the workers’ representatives on a committee are appointed through a vote taken at a meeting convened for that purpose by a worker of the establishment.
Notice of the vote and of the meeting for nominations must be posted up in the establishment at least 5 days before the activities take place, so that all workers concerned may take part.
The candidates among the workers who obtain the most votes are appointed representatives.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 15.
16. No one may prevent a vote prescribed in this Regulation from being held.
The employer must allow the notices of the vote and of the meeting for nominations prescribed in sections 13 and 15 to be posted up.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 16.
17. The number of workers’ representatives on the committee is revised annually, one year after the notice referred to in section 69 of the Act is sent, or whenever the number of workers represented by a certified association in an establishment varies by more than 20%.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 17.
DIVISION V
RULES OF OPERATION
18. A committee shall hold its first meeting within 30 days after its members have been appointed.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 18.
19. A committee shall meet within 3 working days after a request of one of its members, where one of the incidents enumerated in the first paragraph of section 62 of the Act occurs.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 19.
20. A committee in an establishment employing fewer than 25 workers shall meet at least once every 3 months. A committee in an establishment employing from 25 to 100 workers shall meet at least once every 2 months. A committee in an establishment employing more than 100 workers shall meet at least once a month.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 20.
21. A committee shall appoint 2 co-chairmen from among its members; one representing the workers and chosen by the members who represent the workers on the committee; and the other representing the employer and chosen by the employer’s representatives on the committee.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 21.
22. Committee meetings are presided over by each co-chairman in turn.
The committee shall decide which co-chairman will preside over the first meeting. Where there is disagreement, the co-chairman is determined by a draw.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 22.
23. Where the co-chairman who was to preside over a meeting is absent, the group to which he belongs shall appoint a chairman for the meeting from among its members.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 23.
24. Any vacancy in the committee co-chairmanship is filled in accordance with section 21, not later than 10 days after the committee has been notified thereof.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 24.
25. The co-chairman shall determine the agenda of a meeting.
The notice convening a meeting must specify the subjects to be discussed during the meeting. The notice is given by the co-chairman who is to preside over the meeting.
At the beginning of a meeting, any committee member may propose subjects to be added to the agenda; these subjects may be discussed at the meeting where the other members have agreed thereto.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 25.
26. For a meeting to be held, at least half of the members who represent the workers and at least one member who represents the employer on a committee must take part.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 26.
27. Where, at a meeting, the employer’s representatives fail to agree on the position to be adopted with regard to a particular question, the position of that party is that which has received the majority vote of the employer’s representatives attending the meeting.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 27.
28. Where, at a meeting, the committee members who represent the workers fail to agree on the position to be adopted with regard to a particular question, the position of that party is that which has received the majority vote of the committee members who represent the workers attending the meeting.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 28.
29. The workers’ and employer’s representatives on a committee shall perform their duties as long as the employer, the certified association or the group of workers not represented by the certified association that appointed them remains authorized to do so and as long as they have not been replaced by the latter.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 29.
30. Any vacancy in a committee must, not later than 30 days after the committee is notified thereof, be filled by the certified association, the group of workers not represented by a certified association or the employer that appointed the committee member to whom the vacancy is attributable.
Where a certified association or group of workers not represented by a certified association fails to fill a vacancy during the prescribed period, the post left vacant is filled in accordance with section 10, 11 or 12, as long as the appointment has not been made.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 30.
31. At each meeting, a committee shall approve the minutes of its previous meeting. The minutes thus approved must be kept by the employer for a minimum period of 5 years.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 31.
32. A committee shall enter the minutes of its meetings in a register provided for that purpose; the register is kept at a place determined by the committee.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 32.
33. The committee members may, upon request, obtain a copy of the minutes of the committee.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 33.
DIVISION VI
ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES
34. Before 31 March of each year, a committee shall send to the Commission an annual report of activities covering the period from 1 January to 31 December and containing the following information:
(1)  identification of the certified associations represented on the committee;
(2)  the number of workers in the establishment;
(3)  the list of committee members and their function in the establishment;
(4)  the frequency of meetings and the average annual rate of attendance at the meetings;
(5)  the name of the physician in charge of health services in the establishment;
(6)  any amendments made to the prevention program that ensue from recommendations of the committee;
(7)  the number and the nature of complaints received; and
(8)  the number of inquiries carried out pursuant to paragraph 9 of section 78 of the Act, specifying the incidents that caused a work accident or an occupational disease.
O.C. 2025-83, s. 34.
DIVISION VII
FINAL PROVISION
35. (Omitted).
O.C. 2025-83, s. 35.
GROUP 1
(A) CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
(1) General contractors
This category includes general construction firms that are primarily engaged in the construction of buildings, highways, or heavy construction such as marine installations, dams, and hydro-electric plants; it excludes establishments that do some construction work but are primarily engaged in another activity such as utility operation, manufacturing, or mining.
(a) Building construction
General construction firms that are primarily engaged in the construction, alteration and repair of buildings including houses, farm buildings, public buildings, industrial and commercial buildings. This category includes general construction firms and their construction sites that are primarily engaged in speculative buildings.
(b) Highway, bridge and street construction
General construction firms that are primarily engaged in the construction and repair of highways, grade separations, streets, bridges, viaducs, and airports. This category excludes general construction firms and their construction sites that are primarily engaged in highway or street maintenance, such as tarring, sprinkling, filling potholes and snow removal.
(c) Other construction
General construction firms that are primarily engaged in the construction of such projects as waterworks, gas mains, sewers, hydro-electric plants, transmission lines, telephone lines, power canals, dams, dikes, harbours and canals (including dredging), docks and piers, other marine construction, radio towers, railway right-of-way and structures, and other construction projects not classified elsewhere.
(2) Special-trade contractors
This category includes special-trade construction firms that are primarily engaged in construction work. Special-trade contractors perform only part of the work covered by a contract taken by a general contractor. In all instances, a sub-contractor working on part of a project is classified in this category as is jobbing trade work performed directly for owners. Special-trade contractors are often engaged in repair and maintenance work, done at site, on buildings of all types. However, this category excludes maintenance or repair work done by maintenance staffs employed fulltime by the establishments on whose premises the work is being done, as well as special-trade construction firms and construction sites on which they are the sole firm, which are primarily engaged in some other activity such as the fabrication of structural steel parts but which also erect the steel on the sites. Special-trade construction firms classified in this category, include those engaged in bricklaying, carpentry, cement work, electrical work, lathing, plastering, stucco work, painting, decorating, plumbing, heating, air conditioning installations, roofing, terrazzo work, steel erection, excavating, flooring, glazing, insulation of buildings, weather stripping, demolition of buildings, water well drilling, sheet metal work, tiling, marble and stone work.
(B) CHEMICAL AND CHEMICAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES
(1) Manufacturers of mixed fertilizers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing mixed fertilizers, including custom mixing. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing chemicals such as ammonium nitrate which, in addition to their use as fertilizer materials, also have other important industrial uses, are classified in subparagraph 7.
(2) Manufacturers of plastics and synthetic resins
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing synthetic resins in such forms as powders, granules, flakes or liquids, or in compounding synthetic resins into moulding compounds. These establishments may manufacture such products as plastic film and sheet, extrusions and the like from resins of their own manufacture. Establishments primarily engaged in moulding, extruding and otherwise shaping plastic materials or articles from resins manufactured elsewhere are classified in subparagraph G2. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing chemicals for use in making synthetic resins are classified in subparagraph 7. Establishments primarily engaged in the extrusion of synthetic textile filaments are excluded.
(3) Manufacturers of pharmaceuticals and medicines
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing drugs and medicines, including manufacturers of patent and proprietary medicines; cod liver oil; and biological products such as antitoxins, bacterins, serums, vaccines; and including establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing antibiotics and those primarily engaged in grinding drugs and herbs.
(4) Paint and varnish manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing paints, varnishes, lacquers, enamels and shellac, including establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing products such as putty, filler, oil stain, and thinner.
(5) Manufacturers of soap and cleaning compounds
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing soap in any form, synthetic detergents, cleansers, washing powders and cleaning preparations, including scouring powders and hand cleansers. This category includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing household laundry bleaches and blueings.
(6) Manufacturers of toilet preparations
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing perfumes, cosmetics, lotions, hair dressings, toothpaste and other toilet preparations.
(7) Manufacturers of industrial chemicals
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing basic industrial inorganic chemicals such as acids, alkalis, salts, compressed gases and other inorganic compounds or in manufacturing industrial organic chemicals by chemical processes. This category includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing dry colours, pigments, white leads, lead oxides, iron oxides, iron oxides and titanium dioxide and in manufacturing dyes, and establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing synthetic rubber, superphosphates or compressed organic gases, except petroleum gases. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing coke are classified in subparagraph I1; establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing synthetic resins, in subparagraph 2; and those primarily engaged in manufacturing mixed fertilizers, in subparagraph 1. Petroleum refineries are excluded.
(8) Miscellaneous chemical industries
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing chemical products not classified elsewhere such as explosives, ammunition, insecticides, germicides, inks, matches, adhesives, polishes and dressings. This category includes establishments primarily engaged in coal tar distillation or wood distillation, and establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing deodorants and disinfectants for household, institutional or industrial use, sweeping compounds and dry cleaning preparations.
(C) FORESTRY AND SAWMILLS
(1) Logging
Establishments primarily engaged in felling and bucking, brunching, yarding, forwarding, decking and loading roundwood, recovering lost logs including sinkers, in transporting wood with specialized logging trucks and in driving, booming, sorting, rafting and towing wood (if not licensed as public carriers), and barking mills engaged in producing barked or rossed pulpwood.
(2) Forestry services
Establishments primarily engaged in forestry patrol, fire inspection, fire fighting, forest nurseries, reforestation and other forestry services, whether conducted by government organizations or other organizations, excluding forestry consultants.
(3) Sawmills, planing mills and shingle mills
Establishments primarily engaged in sawing lumber (boards, timbers, dimension stock) spoolwood, lath and other mill products such as shingles, cooperage stock and box shook from logs or bolts; and in dressing and working lumber to produce standard matched, shiplapped or patterned products. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing hardwood flooring and millwork products other than lumber are classified in subparagraph F2. Pulp barking mills are classified in subparagraph 1.
(D) MINES, QUARRIES AND OIL WELLS
(1) Metal mines
(a) Placer gold mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining gold by placer or hydraulic methods, including establishments primarily engaged in dressing and beneficiating the ore and in producing bullion at the site of the mine.
(b) Gold quartz mines
Establishments primarily engaged in operating lode mines for gold, including establishments primarily engaged in dressing and beneficiating the ore and in producing bullion at the site of the mine.
(c) Uranium mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining uranium or radium ores and in dressing and beneficiating such ores.
(d) Iron mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining iron ore and in dressing and beneficiating such ores.
(e) Miscellaneous metal mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining metal ores not classified elsewhere and in dressing and beneficiating such ores, including the following types of mines: silver, copper-gold-silver, nickel-copper, silver-cobalt, silver-lead-zinc, molybdenite, chromite, manganese, mercury, tungsten, titanium, cerium, rare earths, columbium, tantalum, antimony, magnesium and beryllium.
(2) Mineral fuels
(a) Coal mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining coal, whether anthracite, bituminous or lignite, including establishments which break, wash, grade or otherwise prepare coal for use as a fuel, whether operated by a coal-mining enterprise or on a contractual basis.
(b) Crude petroleum and natural gas industry
Establishments primarily engaged in the production of petroleum or natural gas from wells or from surface shales or sands, including establishments primarily engaged in recovering the naphtha content of natural gas. The products of these establishments are pentane and heavier liquids, and liquefied petroleum gases, such as butane, propane and butane-propane mixtures; in some cases, elemental sulphur is recovered as a by-product. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing coal gas, when not combined with a blast furnace or chemical plant, and establishments primarily engaged in distributing manufactured or natural gas to consumers through a system of mains, are excluded.
(3) Non-metal mines (except coal mines)
(a) Asbestos mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining and milling asbestos fibre.
(b) Peat extraction
Establishments primarily engaged in recovering and processing peat.
(c) Gypsum mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining gypsum. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing gypsum products and which also mine gypsum are classified in subparagraph J9.
(d) Miscellaneous non-metal mines
Establishments primarily engaged in mining and milling non-metallic minerals not classified elsewhere, including mines such as the following: soapstone and talc, barite, diatomite, mica, ochre and iron oxide, feldspar, nepheline syenite, quartz, silica, fluorspar, salt, potash, sodium sulphate, lithia, magnesite, brucite, gem stones, pumice, volcanic dust, whiting, pozzolana, kyanite, natro-alunite, sodium carbonate, magnesium sulphate, actinolite, serpentine, strontium, graphite, phosphate, pyrite.
(4) Quarries and sand pits
(a) Stone quarries
Establishments primarily engaged in quarrying and crushing igneous rocks (such as granite) or sedimentary rocks (such as limestone, marble, shale, slate and sandstone). Establishments primarily engaged in cutting, shaping or finishing stone are excluded.
(b) Sand pits or quarries
Establishments primarily engaged in extracting, crushing and screening sand and gravel from pits or quarries.
(5) Services incidental to mining
(a) Contract drilling for petroleum
Establishments primarily engaged in the contractual drilling of wells for petroleum or gas, including establishments that specialize in «spudding in» or «drilling in» and in building, repairing and dismantling rigs and derricks.
(b) Other contract drilling
Establishments primarily engaged in contractual diamond drilling.
(c) Miscellaneous services incidental to mining
Establishments primarily engaged in providing services necessary to the operation of petroleum and gas fields, such as running, cutting and pulling casings, tubes and rods; cementing wells; shooting wells; perforating well casings; acidizing and chemically treating wells; cleaning out, bailing, and swabbing wells; and drilling water intake wells. This category also includes establishments primarily engaged in providing services incidental to the operation of metal and non-metal mining, such as mine exploration and development work including the removal of overburden and the sinking of shafts, as well as old style prospecting, but excludes geophysical surveys, gravimetric surveys and seismographic surveys.
(E) METAL FABRICATING INDUSTRIES
(1) Boiler and plate works
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing heating and power boilers, except cast iron sectional heating boilers, heavy gauge storage tanks, pressure tanks, smokestacks, plate work and similar boiler shop products. Cast iron sectional heating boilers are classified in subparagraph 7.
Some establishments in this category are engaged both in the fabrication of the product and its installation. In these cases, the establishment is classified on the basis of its principal activity, i.e. either fabricating or installing the product.
Establishments installing mainly products of their own manufacture are considered as primarily engaged in fabrication, and are included in that category, but those primarily engaged in erecting purchased boilers or smokestacks are classified in subparagraph A1 c. Establishments primarily engaged in fabricating and erecting large storage tanks which must be assembled at the site are classified in subparagraph 2, and establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing sheet metal tanks are classified in subparagraph 4.
(2) Fabricated structural metal industry
Establishments primarily engaged in fabricating heavy steel parts and similar parts of other metals and alloys for structural purposes. Products in this category include fabricated shapes for bridges, buildings, transmission towers, large tanks and similar structures. Although establishments in this category may erect buildings, bridges, and large tanks as well as fabricate the metal parts thereof, they are primarily engaged in fabrication. Establishments primarily engaged in the erection of buildings, bridges and large tanks from purchased metal parts are excluded.
(3) Ornamental and architectural metal industry
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing ornamental metal work, stairs and staircases, fire escapes, grilles, railings, metal windows (including hermetically sealed), doors and frames and metal partitions. Although establishments in this category may install products of their own manufacture, they are primarily engaged in fabrication. Establishments primarily engaged in the erection or installation of purchased fabricated metal products are excluded.
(4) Metal stamping, pressing and coating industry
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing sheet metal products such as bottle caps, heel caps, metal lath and metal boxes, including establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing pressed metal products such as kitchen utensils, hospital and similar utensils and containers, establishments primarily engaged in coating metal and metal products, such as vitreous enamelware, galvanizing and electroplating except with precious metals, and establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing tin cans and other tinware, and sheet metal products such as metal awnings, heating ducts, roofing and eaves through. Establishments primarily engaged in tinsmithing and sheet metal work on construction projects are excluded. Establishments primarily engaged in making enamelled bathroom fixtures such as bath tubs and sinks are classified in subparagraph 9.
(5) Wire and wire product manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in drawing wire from rods and in manufacturing nails, spikes, staples, bolts, nuts, rivets, screws, washers, wire fencing, screening, wire cloth, barbed wire, tire chains, uninsulated wire rope and cable, kitchen wire goods and other wire products. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing insulated wire and cable are excluded.
(6) Hardware, tool and cutlery manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing edge and hand tools, cutlery and hardware. Important products in this category are axes; chisels; dies, including extrusion moulds, and other metal-working tools; hammers, shovels, hoes, rakes, files, saws, builders’ hardware, marine hardware, non-electric razors and blades, table and kitchen cutlery and a miscellaneous group of products usually known under the term «hardware» and not classified elsewhere. This category also includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing bits, drills, except rock drill bits, which are excluded and other cutting tools for machines or for power-driven hand tools. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing machine tools or power-driven hand tools, those primarily engaged in manufacturing sterling silver or silver-plated cutlery, and those primarily engaged in manufacturing machinists’ precision tools, are excluded.
(7) Heating equipment manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing commercial cooking equipment and major heating apparatus such as furnaces, oil burners, gas burners, steam and hot water heating apparatus and heating equipment not classified elsewhere, including establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing cast iron sectional heating boilers and convection or cast iron radiators. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing electric and non-electric domestic cooking equipment are excluded.
(8) Machine shops
Machine shops primarily engaged in producing machine parts and equipment, other than complete machines, for the trade. This category includes machines shops providing custom and repair services, and establishments primarily engaged in rebuilding or remanufacturing automotive engines, transmissions or drives, but excludes establishments primarily engaged in rebuilding or repairing automotive generators, starter motors and alternators, and excludes establishments primarily engaged in rebuilding such automotive parts as fuel pumps, water pumps, brake shoes, clutches, solenoids and voltage regulators.
(9) Miscellaneous metal fabricating industries
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing metal products not elsewhere classified, such as weather stripping, guns, collapsible tubes, machinery fittings, plumbers’ goods (including enamelled plumbing fixtures), safes and vaults, and forgings such as chains, (except tire chains, classified in subparagraph 5), anchors and axles, including establishments primarily engaged in fabricating bars and rods for reinforcing concrete and those primarily engaged in metal heat treating.
GROUP 2
(F) WOOD INDUSTRY (not including the sawmills classified in subparagraph C3)
(1) Veneer and plywood mills
Establishments primarily engaged in producing plywood or veneer.
(2) Sash, door and other millwork plants
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing mill products such as sash, doors, window and door frames, interior woodwork, mouldings and hardwood flooring. This category also includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing prefabricated, wood-framed buildings or prefabricated panels for buildings or in manufacturing laminated beams and structures. Establishments primarily engaged in producing rough, dressed or worked lumber are classified in subparagraph C3. Establishments primarily engaged in producing plywood or veneer are classified in subparagraph 1.
(3) Wooden box factories
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing wooden boxes and pallets, crates, fruit and vegetable baskets, including establishments making box shook from sawn lumber.
(4) Coffin and casket industry
Establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of coffins, caskets and other morticians’ supplies.
(5) Miscellaneous wood industries
Establishments primarily engaged in wood preservation; in wood turning and in manufacturing wood products not elsewhere classified, including sawdust briquettes. Principal products are beekeepers’ and poultry-men’s supplies, excelsior, woodenware (clothespins, washboards, stepladders, pails and tubs), sanitary woodwork and particle board. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing cooperage such as barrels, casks, kegs, and other containers made of staves are included in this category. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing cooperage stock, but not cooperage, are classified in subparagraph C3.
(G) RUBBER AND PLASTICS PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES
(1) Rubber products industries
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing rubber goods, such as rubber tires and tubes for vehicles, machinery and implements; all-rubber footwear, lumbermen’s boots, unlined or flock-lined plastic galoshes, and footwear having fabric uppers and moulded rubber or plastic soles; rubberized fabrics, mechanical rubber goods, rubber flooring and rubber sundries, including establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of pressure-sensitive tapes including cellulose. Establishments primarily engaged in producing synthetic rubber are classified in subparagraph B7. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing rubberized clothing are excluded.
(2) Plastics fabricating industry, n.e.s.
Establishments primarily engaged in using synthetic resins not classified elsewhere and manufactured elsewhere to mold, extrude or otherwise fabricate basic shapes and forms of plastic or plastic articles which cannot conveniently be classified elsewhere, including synthetic sausage casings, plastic bottles and containers, plastic and fibreglass awnings. Many establishments included in this category manufacture special plastic parts for automobiles, household appliances and the like. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing plastic articles such as toys, buttons, tooth brushes or any other article provided for specifically in another category must be classified in the appropriate category. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing such products as plastic film and sheet, extrusions or the like from resin of their own manufacture are classified in subparagraph B2.
(H) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT INDUSTRIES
(1) Aircraft and aircraft parts manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing aeroplanes, gliders, balloons and aircraft parts, such as engines, propellers and pontoons, including aircraft repair and establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing parts for guided missiles and space vehicles. The manufacture of aeronautical instruments, including electronic navigational equipment, is excluded. Manufacturers of air-cushioned vehicles are classified in subparagraph 8.
(2) Motor vehicle manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing or assembling complete motor vehicles such as passenger automobiles, commercial cars and buses, trucks, and special purpose motor vehicles such as ambulances and taxicabs.
(3) Truck body and trailer manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing truck and bus bodies but not manufacturing complete trucks or buses. Included are establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing truck trailers and tractor-type bus trailers, as well as those primarily engaged in manufacturing trailers for attachment to passenger cars.
(4) Motor vehicle part and accessory manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing motor vehicle parts, except truck and bus bodies, and accessories for use on motor vehicles, such as engines, brakes, clutches, axles, gears, transmissions, wheels, frames, radiators, springs, automobile hardware, heaters, horns, and mirrors. The manufacture of tires and tubes is classified in subparagraph G1; that of automobile glass, in subparagraph J6; those of automobile fabric industries and of batteries are excluded.
(5) Railroad rolling stock industry
Establishments primarily engaged in building and rebuilding locomotives of any type or gauge and railroad cars (including frames and parts) for freight and passenger service.
(6) Shipbuilding and repair
Establishments primarily engaged in building and repairing all types of ships of more than 5 tons displacement.
(7) Boatbuilding and repair
Establishments primarily engaged in building and repairing all types of boats. This industry, for the most part, handles the smaller type of craft, such as motorboats, sailboats, rowboats, lifeboats and canoes.
(8) Miscellaneous vehicle manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing transportation equipment not elsewhere classified, including snowmobiles, air-cushioned vehicles and animal-drawn vehicles including sleighs, as well as parts for any vehicles includes.
(I) PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
(1) Iron and steel mills
This category includes 4 main types of establishments: (1) establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing pig iron and ferroalloys; (2) steel works primarily engaged in manufacturing lingots, steel castings and in continuous casting of steel; (3) rolling mills primarily engaged in hot and cold rolling of steel into primary shapes; and (4) coke ovens operated in connection with blast furnaces. In some cases, the blast furnace, steel mill, rolling mill and coke oven, or some combination of the 2 or more of them, are carried on as one integrated operation, and the manufacturing processes may be carried on beyond the rolling mill stage.
(2) Steel pipe and tube mills
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing welded and seamless steel pipe and tubing. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing riveted pipe are classified in subparagraph E2; those primarily engaged in manufacturing cast iron pipe, in subparagraph 3; and those primarily engaged in manufacturing metal culvert pipe, in subparagraph E4.
(3) Iron founderies
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing iron castings, including cast iron pipe and fittings.
(4) Smelting and refining
Establishments primarily engaged in the smelting of ores bearing non-ferrous metals and/or the refining of non-ferrous metals. For gold mines, production of bullion at the site of the mine is included with the mining operations in subparagraph D1 a or b.
(5) Aluminum rolling, casting and extruding
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing aluminum shapes such as bars, rods, plates, sheets and castings or in manufacturing aluminum powder. Pressure die casting of aluminum is classified in subparagraph 7 and the extraction of aluminum from the ore is classified in subparagraph 4.
(6) Copper and copper alloy rolling, casting and extruding
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing copper and copper alloy shapes such as bars, rods, plates, sheets and castings or in manufacturing bronze powder. Pressure die casting of copper alloys is classified in subparagraph 7, and the extraction of copper from the ore is classified in subparagraph 4.
(7) Metal rolling, casting and extruding, n.e.s.
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing non-ferrous metals such as zinc, tin, lead, nickel and titanium and their alloys in shapes such as bars, rods, plates, sheets and castings, including establishments primarily engaged in pressure die casting of all non-ferrous metals and their alloys and those engaged in the recovery of non-ferrous metals from scrap.
(J) NON-METALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES
(1) Clay products manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing clay brick, roofing, floor and wall ceramic tile; sewer pipe, and other structural clay products, including establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing clay products such as pottery, chinaware, and porcelain insulators. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing clay refractories are classified in subparagraph 9.
(2) Cement manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing hydraulic cement, including Portland, natural masonry and pozzolana cements.
(3) Stone products manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in cutting, shaping and finishing stone for building and other purposes. Important products of this category include monuments and tombstones, dimension stone for buildings, slate blackboards and stone furniture. Establishments that quarry stone and do some shaping and finishing are classified in subparagraph D4a. Establishments primarily engaged in buying and selling monuments and tombstones, even though they do some lettering or finishing, are excluded.
(4) Concrete products manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing concrete products such as building blocks, brick, sewer pipe, tanks, poles, septic tanks, including establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing sand-lime brick and blocks. Establishments engaged in concrete construction work are classified in Division A. Establishments primarily engaged in mixing and delivering of ready-mix concrete are classified in subparagraph 5.
(5) Ready-mix concrete manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in mixing and delivering ready-mix concrete.
(6) Glass and glass products manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing flat glass; plate glass; glass containers; glassware; glass ovenware; glass brick; fibrous glass products except insulation and textile fabrics; mirrors; stained, leaded and ornamental glass; glass novelties and other articles made from glass. This category includes establishments primarily engaged in etching or painting glass or glassware, but excludes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing optical lenses and ophthalmic lenses and those primarily engaged in spinning glass yarns or weaving glass fabrics.
(7) Abrasives manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing abrasive grinding wheels of emery, carborundum and other natural or artificial materials; abrasive sticks, stones, bricks, paper and cloths, and buffing and polishing wheels, including the manufacture of primary abrasive materials such as fused alumina and silicon carbide.
(8) Lime manufacturers
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing quicklime and hydrated lime.
(9) Miscellaneous non-metallic mineral products industries
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing miscellaneous non-metallic mineral products not classified elsewhere, such as refractories, clay and non-clay gypsum products; mineral wool products; asbestos products; mica products; expanded vermiculite; expanded perlite; roofing granules and dead-burned dolomite. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing petroleum and coal products are excluded.
O.C. 2025-83, Sch. 1.
REFERENCES
O.C. 2025-83, 1983 G.O. 2, 3495
S.Q. 2015, c. 15, s. 237